Articles scientifiques

Inventory allocation models for a two-stage, twoproduct, capacitated supplier and retailer problem with random demand

K. LUO, R. BOLLAPRAGADA, L. KERBACHE

International Journal of Production Economics

A paraître

Départements : Informations Systems and Operations Management, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : supply chain management, inventory management, capacity allocation, heuristic methods

http://ac.els-cdn.com/S0925527316303930/1-s2.0-S0925527316303930-main.pdf?_tid=e3dcdf78-c36d-11e6-ab1d-00000aacb362&acdnat=1481878922_0f8e1cce572aa5799576c97c7d14f216


The objective of this research is to develop an optimal inventory allocation methodology for a supply chain consisting of a capacitated retailer with limited shelf space, and two unreliable capacitated suppliers in an uncertain environment. We develop conceptual and analytical models that provide allocation preferences between shelf-space and warehouse in both deterministic and stochastic demand cases, and develop managerial insights based on them. For each case, we provide both a closed-form solution and a heuristic method, and illustrate the bounds on the optimal solution. Further, we show that the cost function is L-convex in some cases. Finally, we prove that the expected profit decreases as the variance of demand increases

Scheduling non-operating room anesthesia cases in endoscopy: using the sandbox analogy

M. TSAI, L. CIPRI, S. O’DONNELL, M. FISHER, A. ANDRITSOS

Journal of Clinical Anesthesia

A paraître

Départements : Informations Systems and Operations Management, GREGHEC (CNRS)


Social Presence in Virtual World Collaboration: An Uncertainty Reduction Perspective Using a Mixed Methods Approach

S. C. SRIVASTAVA, S. CHANDRA

MIS Quarterly

A paraître

Départements : Informations Systems and Operations Management, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Virtual worlds, uncertainty reduction theory, institutional trust, sequential mixed methods

http://www.misq.org/skin/frontend/default/misq/pdf/Abstracts/11914_RA_SrivastavaAbstract.pdf


The life-like collaborative potential offered by virtual worlds (VWs) has sparked significant interest for companies to experiment with VWs in order to organize convenient, cost-effective virtual global workplaces. Despite the initial hype, recent years have witnessed a rather stagnant use of VWs for collaboration in organizations. Previous research recognizes that the inherent uncertainties within the VW environment are factors limiting their utilization by businesses. Hence, grounding this research in uncertainty reduction theory (URT), we aim to understand the modalities and mechanisms for mitigating the uncertainties and fostering user trust within VWs so that they can be effectively utilized as a workplace collaboration tool. With this end in view, we propose contextualizing and extending McKnight et al.’s (2002) institutional trust framework to the context of VWs by examining the significant role that social presence has in influencing the efficacy of the institution-based trust-building factors of situational normality and structural assurance in VWs. Using a sequential mixed methods approach (Venkatesh et al. 2013; Venkatesh et al. 2016), this research integrates results from a quantitative study with findings from a qualitative study to arrive at rich and robust inferences and meta-inferences, with the qualitative method first corroborating the inferences obtained from the quantitative research and then complementing them by identifying boundary conditions that may limit the use of VWs in organizations for workplace collaboration. The results together suggest not only the direct, but also the interactional (complementary and substitutive) influences of social presence on the relationships of the two institutional-trust-building factors to user trust in VWs

Analyzing Degree of Parallelism for Concurrent Timed Workflow Processes With Shared Resources

Yanhua DU, Li WANG, X. LI

IEEE Transactions on Engineering Management

février 2017, vol. 64, n°1, pp.42 - 56

Départements : Informations Systems and Operations Management, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Business, Servers, Computational modeling, Uncertainty, Analytical models, Processor scheduling, workflow management, Business process management, degree of parallelism, Petri net (PN), timed workflow net (TWF-Net)

http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/7778113/


Degree of parallelism is an important factor in workflow process management, because it is useful to accurately estimate the server costs and schedule severs in workflow processes. However, existing methods that are developed to compute degree of parallelism neglect to consider activities with uncertain execution time. In addition, these methods are limited in dealing with the situation where activities in multiple concurrent workflow processes use shared resources. To address the limitations, we propose a new approach to analyzing degree of parallelism for concurrent workflow processes with shared resources. Superior over the existing methods, our approach can compute degree of parallelism for multiple concurrent workflow processes that have activities with uncertain execution time and shared resources. Expectation degree of parallelism is useful to estimate the server costs of the workflow processes, and maximum degree of parallelism can guide managers to allocate severs or virtual machines based on the business requirement. We demonstrate the application of the approach and evaluate the effectiveness in a real-world business scenario.

Pricing and Capacity Allocation for Shared Services

V. KOSTAMI, D. KOSTAMIS, S. ZIYA

Manufacturing & Service Operations Management

printemps 2017, vol. 19, n°2, pp.230-245

Départements : Informations Systems and Operations Management

Mots clés : customer mix; customer interaction; price discrimination; capacity allocation; shared services

http://pubsonline.informs.org/doi/abs/10.1287/msom.2016.0606


We study the pricing and capacity allocation problem of a service provider who serves two distinct customer classes. Customers in each class are inherently heterogeneous in their willingness to pay for service, but their utilities are also affected by the presence of other customers in the system. Specifically, customer utilities depend on how many customers are in the system at the time of service as well as who these other customers are. We find that if the service provider can price discriminate between customer classes, pricing out a class, i.e., operating an exclusive system, can sometimes be optimal and depends only on classes’ perceptions of each other. If the provider must charge a single price, an exclusive system is even more likely. We extend our analysis to a service provider who can prevent class interaction by allocating separate capacity segments to the two customer classes. Under price discrimination, allocating capacity is optimal if the “net appreciation” between classes, as defined in the paper, is negative. However, under a single-price policy, allocating capacity can be optimal even if this net appreciation is positive. We describe in detail how the nature of asymmetry in classes’ perception of each other determines the optimal strategy

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Informations Systems and Operations Management


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Faculté  

Michel FENDER

Informations Systems and Operations Management

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