Articles scientifiques

Choosing a Digital Content Strategy: How Much Should be Free?

D. HALBHEER, F. STAHL, O. KOENIGSBERG, D. LEHMANN

International Journal of Research in Marketing

juin 2014, vol. 31, n°2, pp.192-206

Départements : Marketing, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Information Goods, Sampling, Content Pricing, Advertising, Dorfman- Steiner Condition


This paper studies content strategies for online publishers of digital informationgoods. It examines sampling strategies and compares their performance to paidcontent and free content strategies. A sampling strategy, where some of the contentis offered for free and consumers are charged for access to the rest, is knownas a “metered model” in the newspaper industry. We analyze optimal decisionsconcerning the size of the sample and the price of the paid content when samplingserves the dual purpose of disclosing content quality and generating advertisingrevenue. We show in a reduced-form model how the publisher’s optimal ratio ofadvertising revenue to sales revenue is linked to characteristics of both the contentmarket and the advertising market. We assume that consumers learn about contentquality from the free samples in a Bayesian fashion. Surprisingly, we find that itcan be optimal for the publisher to generate advertising revenue by offering freesamples even when sampling reduces both prior quality expectations and contentdemand. In addition, we show that it can be optimal for the publisher to refrainfrom revealing quality through free samples when advertising effectiveness is lowand content quality is high

Claiming the credit

M. BERTINI, D. HALBHEER, O. KOENIGSBERG

Business Strategy Review

2014, vol. 25, n°8

Départements : Marketing

Mots clés : *BUSINESS -- Decision making *RESEARCH *EXECUTIVES *CORPORATE profits


Impartial decisions in the best interests of the organisation are more elusive than you might think

Consumer Attitude Metrics For Guiding Marketing Mix Decisions

D. HANSSENS, K. PAUWELS, S. SRINIVASAN, M. VANHUELE, G. YILDIRIM

Marketing Science

juillet-août 2014, vol. 33, n°4, pp.534-550

Départements : Marketing, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Consumer attitude metrics, Responsiveness, Potential, Stickiness, Sales conversion, Hierarchical linear model, Cross-effects model, Empirical generalizations, Dynamic programming model, Optimal marketing resource allocation

http://dx.doi.org/10.1287/mksc.2013.0841


Marketing managers often use consumer attitude metrics such as awareness, consideration, and preference as performance indicators because they represent their brand's health and are readily connected to marketing activity. However, this does not mean that financially focused executives know how such metrics translate into sales performance, which would allow them to make beneficial marketing mix decisions. We propose four criteria—potential, responsiveness, stickiness, and sales conversion—that determine the connection between marketing actions, attitudinal metrics, and sales outcomes.We test our approach with a rich data set of four-weekly marketing actions, attitude metrics, and sales for several consumer brands in four categories over a seven-year period. The results quantify how marketing actions affect sales performance through their differential impact on attitudinal metrics, as captured by our proposed criteria. We find that marketing–attitude and attitude–sales relationships are predominantly stable over time but differ substantially across brands and product categories. We also establish that combining marketing and attitudinal metrics criteria improves the prediction of brand sales performance, often substantially so. Based on these insights, we provide specific recommendations on improving the marketing mix for different brands, and we validate them in a holdout sample. For managers and researchers alike, our criteria offer a verifiable explanation for differences in marketing elasticities and an actionable connection between marketing and financial performance metrics

Does luxury have a minimum price? An exploratory study into consumers' psychology of luxury prices

J.-N. KAPFERER, C. KLIPPERT, L. LEPROUX

Journal of Revenue & Pricing Management

février 2014, vol. 13, n°1, pp.2-11

Départements : Marketing


Consumer studies show that luxury evokes high prices. However, the remarkable growth of this sector is based on its extension to the middle class, with affordable prices. This is a paradox: luxury needs to be expensive, yet grew being accessible. Hence the question: If consumers want to access to luxury, below what price would they consider that it is no more luxury? Is there a minimum price? This research explores how consumers decode luxury prices, how are lower prices compatible with luxury. Strong brands have indeed a larger latitude for accessible pricing than new luxury brands

Does Marketing and Sales Integration Always Pay Off? Evidence from a Social Perspective

D. ROUZIES, J. HULLAND

Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science

septembre 2014, vol. 42, n°5, pp.511-527

Départements : Marketing, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Marketing organization, Sales organization, Marketing and sales interface, Social capital


Building on social capital theory, we view the marketing and sales interface as set of inter-group ties and investigate how cross-functional relationships may facilitate the development of social capital associated with value creation. Our findings suggest that capital embedded in marketing and sales relationships can inhibit a firm's performance depending on the characteristics of its customers. Our results also demonstrate that managing the marketing and sales interface at different levels of customer concentration is critical to the success of a firm's performance


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