Articles scientifiques

Incorporating hidden costs of annoying ads in display auctions


International Journal of Research in Marketing

septembre 2017, vol. 34, n°3, pp.622-640

Départements : Marketing, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Online advertising, Pricing, Mechanism design

Media publisher platforms often face an effectiveness-nuisance tradeoff: more annoying ads can be more effective for some advertisers because of their ability to attract attention, but after attracting viewers’ attention, their nuisance to viewers can decrease engagement with the platform over time. With the rise of mobile technology and ad blockers, many platforms are becoming increasingly concerned about how to improve monetization through digital ads while improving viewer experience.We study an online ad auction mechanism that incorporates a charge for ad impact on user experience as a criterion for ad selection and pricing. Like a Pigovian tax, the charge causes advertisers to internalize the hidden cost of foregone future platform revenue due to ad impact on user experience. Over time, the mechanism provides an incentive for advertisers to develop ads that are effective while offering viewers a more pleasant experience. We show that adopting the mechanism can simultaneously benefit the publisher, advertisers, and viewers, even in the short term.Incorporating a charge for ad impact can increase expected advertiser profits if enough advertisers compete. A stronger effectiveness-nuisance tradeoff, meaning that ad effectiveness is more strongly associated with negative impact on user experience, increases the amount of competition required for the mechanism to benefit advertisers. The findings suggest that the mechanism can benefit the marketplace for ad slots that consistently attract many advertisers

Payment Evasion


Journal of Industrial Economics

décembre 2017, vol. 67, n°4, pp.804-832

Départements : Marketing, GREGHEC (CNRS)

This paper shows that a firm can use the purchase price and the fine imposedon detected payment evaders to discriminate between unobservable con-sumer types. Assuming that consumers self-select into regular buyers andpayment evaders, we show that the firm typically engages in second-degreeprice discrimination in which the purchase price exceeds the expected fine.In addition, we find that higher fines do not necessarily reduce paymentevasion. We illustrate with data from fare dodging on public transportation

Person–Organization Fit and Incentives: A Causal Test


Management Science

2017, vol. 63, n°1, pp.73-96

Départements : Marketing

Mots clés : tournaments; organizational culture; personal values; person–organization fit; teams; economic incentives

We investigate the effects of organizational culture and personal values on performance under individual and team contest incentives. We develop a model of regard for others and in-group favoritism that predicts interaction effects between organizational values and personal values in contest games. These predictions are tested in a computerized lab experiment with exogenous control of both organizational values and incentives. In line with our theoretical model, we find that prosocial (proself)-orientated subjects exert more (less) effort in team contests in the primed prosocial organizational values condition, relative to the neutrally primed baseline condition. Further, when the prosocial organizational values are combined with individual contest incentives, prosocial subjects no longer outperform their proself counterparts. These findings provide, to our knowledge, a first, affirmative, causal test of person–organization fit theory. They also suggest the importance of a “triple-fit” between personal preferences, organizational values, and incentive mechanisms for prosocially orientated individuals

Using sublexical priming to enhance brand name phonetic symbolism effects in young children


Marketing Letters

décembre 2017, vol. 28, n°4, pp.565–577

Départements : Marketing, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Phonetic symbolism . Children . Phonological awareness. Priming . Sublexical

We examine whether phonetic symbolism effects are conditional on the development of phonological awareness (an ability to recognize sounds in words). Further, we introduce sublexical priming as a means to enhance phonetic symbolism effects. Across four experiments, we demonstrate that product evaluations, consistent with phonetic symbolism theory, are more (less) likely when a child is older (younger). Specifically, older children who can recognize sounds in words perceive back vowel brand names (e.g., Vopoz) as slower, heavier, larger, smoother, creamier, chewier, and thicker than brand names with front vowel sounds (e.g., Vipiz). In addition, we show that phonetic symbolism effects manifest when younger children (low in phonological awareness) are primed to focus on parts of a word/s, which we term sublexical priming. We present embedded tasks and chunking of brand names as strategic communication techniques that can be implemented as sublexical primes to enhance phonetic symbolism effects in younger children

We look like our names: The manifestation of name stereotypes in facial appearance


Journal of Personality and Social Psychology

avril 2017, vol. 112, n°4, pp.527-554

Départements : Marketing, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : face perception, naming, self-fulfilling prophecy, social influence, stereotypes

Research demonstrates that facial appearance affects social perceptions. The current research investigates the reverse possibility: Can social perceptions influence facial appearance? We examine a social tag that is associated with us early in life—our given name. The hypothesis is that name stereotypes can be manifested in facial appearance, producing a face-name matching effect, whereby both a social perceiver and a computer are able to accurately match a person’s name to his or her face. In eight studies we demonstrate the existence of this effect, as participants examining an unfamiliar face accurately select the person’s true name from a list of several names, significantly above chance level. We replicate the effect in two countries and find that it extends beyond the limits of socioeconomic cues. We also find the effect using a computer-based paradigm and 94,000 faces. In our exploration of the underlying mechanism, we show that existing name stereotypes produce the effect, as its occurrence is culture-dependent and a function of the name prevalence in society. A self-fulfilling prophecy seems to be at work, as initial evidence shows that facial appearance regions that are controlled by the individual (e.g., hairstyle) are sufficient to produce the effect, and socially using one’s given name is necessary to generate the effect. Together, these studies suggest that facial appearance represents social expectations of how a person with a specific name should look. In this way a social tag may influence one’s facial appearance