Articles scientifiques

The Impact of Religiosity and Culture on Salesperson Job Satisfaction and Performance

V. ONYEMAH, D. ROUZIES, D. IACOBUCCI

International Journal of Cross Cultural Management

A paraître

Départements : Marketing, GREGHEC (CNRS)


Brand Assets and Pay Fairness as Two Routes to Enhancing Social Capital in Sales Organization

Maria ROUZIOU, Riley DUGAN, Dominique ROUZIES, Dawn IACOBUCCI

Journal of Personal Selling & Sales Management

2018, vol. 38, n°2, pp.191-204

Départements : Marketing, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : brand identification, job satisfaction, pay fairness, salespeople, social capital

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/08853134.2017.1384699


A growing body of research in sales highlights the importance of intrafirm relationships. Indeed, sales executives are encouraged to manage internal relationships within their sales force to facilitate high levels of performance. In this research, we examine the concept of social capital – its antecedents and consequences – in the context of a B2B sales organization. In particular, we conceptualize and test two alternative means of enhancing a salesperson's social capital: the impact of branding and perceptions of pay fairness. We then demonstrate how social capital embedded in sales-force relationships can be leveraged through job satisfaction and used to increase sales performance

Optimizing Service Failure and Damage Control

D. HALBHEER, D. L. GÄRTNER, E. GERSTNER, O. KOENIGSBERG

International Journal of Research in Marketing

mars 2018, vol. 35, n°1, pp.100-115

Départements : Marketing, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Service Quality, Service Reliability, Service Failure, Damage Control

https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2704861


Should a provider deliver a reliable service or should it allow for occasional service failures? This paper derives conditions under which randomizing service quality can benefit the provider and society. In addition to cost considerations, heterogeneity in customer damages from service failures allows the provider to generate profit from selling damage prevention services or offering compensation to high-damage customers. This strategy is viable even when reputation counts and markets are competitive

A multi-cultural study of salespeople's behavior in individual pay-for-performance compensation systems: when managers are more equal and less fair than others

D. ROUZIES, Vincent ONYEMAH, Dawn IACOBUCCI

Journal of Personal Selling & Sales Management

septembre 2017, vol. 37, n°3, pp.198-212

Départements : Marketing, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : financial incentives; fairness; salespeople; international compensation; culture

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/08853134.2017.1337519


In this research, we examine salespeople’s behavior in individual pay-for-performance compensation systems and show how perceived management fairness seems to energize sales employees in some environments but not in others. We use alarge multicountry database of individual-level remuneration for more than 2,500 salespeople across four B2B industrysectors to demonstrate cultural adaptations of the effect of perceived management fairness. The results indicate that topmanagement should be concerned with employees’ perceptions of fairness in addition to the more typical concerns ofcontrol and motivation widely acknowledged in the microeconomics-based sales-force compensation literature. Inparticular, we show that perceptions of management fairness are key to salespeople’s proportion of total pay generated by pay-for-performance formulas.

An Experience-Utility Explanation of the Preference for Larger Assortments

A. AYDINLI, Y. GU, M. PHAM

International Journal of Research in Marketing

septembre 2017, vol. 34, n°3, pp.746-760

Départements : Marketing, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Assortment size; Affect; Emotion; Consumer decision making

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0167811617300526


Although choosing from large assortments has often been found to be demotivating, a robust finding in the marketing literature is that consumers generally prefer larger product assortments. Standard explanations for this preference for larger assortments have focused on reason-based considerations revolving around large assortments enabling potentially “better” choices. This paper offers a different and novel, affect-based explanation. We argue that the relative preference for larger assortments is driven in part by the greater experience utility that consumers derive from reviewing such assortments. Because most products are carriers of positive affect, consumers tend to derive greater experience utility from reviewing larger assortments compared to smaller assortments. Support for this general proposition was found across four experimental studies using different strategies to document the role of affect-based experience utility in driving the preference for larger assortments. Theoretical and substantive implications are discussed


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