Séminaires de recherche

Marketing Social Responsibility

Marketing

Intervenant : Sumitro Banerjee, Assistant Professor of Marketing
EMST European School of Management and Technology GmbH

15 décembre 2011 - Salle H010 - De 12:30 à 14:00

In Praise of Putting Things Off: Postponing Consumption Pleasures Facilitates Self-Control

Marketing

Intervenant : Nicole Mead, Assistant Professor of Marketing
Catolica-Lisbon School of Business and Economics, Palma de Cima, Lisbon

1 décembre 2011 - Salle H033 - De 12:30 à 14:00

Consumer Reactions to Need Threat Depend on the Type of Threat: How Social Exclusion Influences Conspicuous Consumption and Charitable Giving

Marketing

Intervenant : Mr L.J. SHRUM
University of Texas at San Antonio

25 novembre 2011 - Salle H041 - De 12:00 à 16:00

Social exclusion has been shown to produce quite varied responses. This research examines the proposition that social exclusion may produce either self-focused or prosocial responses, depending on which needs are threatened. In four experiments, we tested the hypothesis that different types of social exclusion threaten different needs, which in turn produce distinct outcomes (differential needs hypothesis). Social exclusion in the form of being implicitly ignored increased conspicuous consumption, whereas being explicitly rejected increased helping and donation behavior. However, when efficacy needs (power, meaningful existence) were bolstered, the effects of being ignored were eliminated, whereas when relational needs (self-esteem) were bolstered, the effects of being rejected were eliminated. The results indicate that certain types of social exclusion produce prosocial and affiliative responses, whereas others produce self-focused and attention-getting responses.

Towards an Understanding of Children’s Consumption Knowledge: Consumption Constellations, Experiential vs. Material Preferences, and Sound Symbolism

Marketing

Intervenant : Ms Tina LOWREY
University of Texas at San Antonio

25 novembre 2011 - Salle H041 - De 12:00 à 16:00

Children as young as five have been shown to be able to comprehend and compose consumption constellations (i.e., group together products and brands in a symbolic manner to describe stereotypical social roles; Chaplin & Lowrey, 2010). I briefly review this research as a precursor to current research projects that investigate the relation between children’s levels of materialism and their happiness and the extent to which children value material objects over experiences. Adults have been shown to value experiences over material objects, but our preliminary findings show that children demonstrate the opposite preference, at least until their later teen years, at which time their preferences begin to resemble those of adults. Finally, in related research (Baxter & Lowrey, 2011), I discuss children’s preferences for brand names that phonetically convey the attributes of the toys they are naming, as well as children’s preferences for brand logos that match the phonetic symbolism of those brand names, research that builds on previous and current work on phonetic symbolism and brand names (Lowrey & Shrum, 2007; Shrum, Lowrey, Luna, Lerman, & Liu, 2011).

Explaining Cross-Country Differences in the Effects of R&D Expenditures on Risk and Stock Returns

Marketing

Intervenant : Hubert Gatignon
Claude Janssen Chaired Professor of Business Administration and Professor of Marketing, INSEAD

17 novembre 2011 - Salle H009 - De 12:30 à 14:00


JavaScriptSettings