Séminaires de recherche

Seeking and Avoiding Choice Closure

Marketing

Intervenant : Yangjie GU
Assistante Professeur de Marketing , Tilburg University, les Pays-Bas

11 décembre 2014 - Bâtiment T, Salle 201 (T201) - De 10h30 à 12h00


Achieving a sense of finality with past decisions, or reaching closure with one’s choices, is generally regarded as beneficial to subjective wellbeing. We instead investigate circumstances under which reaching closure about a choice prevents satisfaction maximization: when post-choice information characterizes a decision outcome as inferior, choice closure inhibits unfavorable comparisons and enhances satisfaction; but when it characterizes this outcome as superior, choice closure inhibits favorable comparisons and fails to enhance satisfaction. Building on research showing that closure can be externally facilitated, we demonstrate that visual cues can trigger a sense of finality. To maximize satisfaction, consumers should seek such triggers when faced with an inferior outcome and avoid them when faced with a superior outcome. However, we show that participants decide to employ or avoid choice-closure triggers in ways that fail to enhance satisfaction, and that nudging them against their default inclinations may be needed in regulating post-choice satisfaction.

Intertemporal Discounting and Reference Durations

Marketing

Intervenant : Florian STAHL
Professor of Marketing , University of Mannheim, Germany

9 décembre 2014 - Room T201 - De 14h00 à 15h30


Intertemporal Discounting and Reference Durations

by Florian Stahl, Raghuram Iyengar, Yuxin Chen and Andreas Herrmann

Products and services are increasingly offered with contracts of different length. Consumers' choice of a specific contract involves an intertemporal decision, as they have to discount future utility. Given the long duration of some contracts, it is likely that consumers' instantaneous utility for a service is time dependent. We study individuals' discounting behavior allowing for changes in instantaneous utility. We gather experimental data from matching tasks and identify discounting patterns using a latent change-point model. Our results show that models with change-points fit individuals' discounting pattern significantly better than models without. There is also conceptual superiority of including change-points as these are highly correlated with durations that consumers may consider in their decisions (e.g., time till graduation). Interestingly, individuals' discounting pattern is consistent with exponential discounting in the absence of change-points but follows a hyperbolic discounting pattern when allowing consumers' instantaneous utility to change over time. Using a novel monetarily incentivized experimental setting, we show that individuals are not able to discount future outcomes without a bias towards the present even when they have an incentive to do so.

The CSR Surprise Effect: When Unexpected CSR Activity Enhances Brand Evaluations

Marketing

Intervenant : H. ONUR BODUR
Professor of Marketing , John Molson School of Business Concordia University

22 mai 2014 - Salle T022 - De 13h00 à 14h30


The CSR Surprise Effect: When Unexpected CSR Activity Enhances Brand Evaluations


ALI TEZER*
H. ONUR BODUR
BIANCA GROHMANN

This research examines the influence of the expectancy of corporate social responsibility
(CSR) activities on brand evaluations. We define expectancy of a CSR activity as the extent to
which a specific brand’s CSR activity deviates from consumers’ mental schema regarding
brands’ CSR activities. A deviation from a mental schema (i.e., unexpected information)
increases elaboration and influences evaluations. Exposed to unexpected CSR activities,
consumers scrutinize CSR information. Earlier research on CSR activities documents negative
effects of elaboration. Building on earlier work, we investigate to what extent expectancy of the
CSR activity prompts elaborations and whether the nature of elaborations positively influences
subsequent brand evaluations.

In three experiments, we examine the role of CSR expectancy and show a positive effect
of unexpected CSR activities when CSR fit is high. We also consider the underlying mechanism
of the positive influence of the unexpected CSR: When CSR fit is high, greater elaboration due
to unexpected CSR activity makes perceived sincerity of the brand’s motivation for CSR
involvement more salient, which enhances brand evaluations. The amount of elaboration does
not increase when the CSR activity is expected and consumers use simple heuristics. Finally, we
provide a boundary condition: Consumers who are generally involved in brands’ CSR activities
are not differentially affected by varying levels of CSR expectancy. However, a positive effect
of the unexpected CSR activity emerged for consumers with low levels of CSR involvement,
suggesting unexpected CSR can especially help attract those consumers who are less involved.

*Ali Tezer is doctoral student, Marketing Department, Concordia University. H. Onur Bodur is
Associate Professor, Marketing Department, Concordia University. Bianca Grohmann is
Associate Professor, Marketing Department, John Molson School of Business, 1455 De
Maisonneuve Blv. W., Montreal, QC, H3G 1M8 (Canada). The authors acknowledge the support
of Centre for Multidisciplinary Behavioural Business Research (CMBBR) and David O’Brien
Centre for Sustainable Enterprise (DOCSE) at Concordia University.

Building Social Media Intelligence

Marketing

Intervenant : David A. Schweidel
Professor of Marketing , Emory University

20 mai 2014 - Salle T027 - De 15h00 à 16h30


Building Social Media Intelligence


In the world of Facebook, Twitter and Yelp, water-cooler conversations with co-workers and backyard small talk with neighbors have moved from the physical world to the digital arena. In this new landscape, organizations ranging from Fortune 500 companies to government agencies to political campaigns continuously monitor online opinions in an effort to guide their actions. Are consumers satisfied with our product? How are our policies perceived? Do voters agree with our platform?

But measuring online opinion is more complex than just reading a few posted reviews. Social media is replete with its share of noise and chatter that can contaminate monitoring efforts. But by knowing what shapes online opinions, we can better uncover the valuable insights hidden in the social media chatter – insights that can inform our organization’s strategy. In this workshop, we discuss how organizations can move beyond the current practice of social media monitoring to develop social media intelligence that can drive marketing decisions.

A Meaningful Embrace: Contingent Effects of Embodied Cues of Affection

Marketing

Intervenant : Ana Valenzuela
Professeur Associé à Zicklin School of Business, Baruch College, CUNY et Professeur Visiting Associé à l'Universidad Pompeu Fabra.

7 avril 2014 - Salle T022 - De 13h00 à 14h30


A Meaningful Embrace: Contingent Effects of Embodied Cues of Affection

Rhonda Hadi, Oxford University
Ana Valenzuela, Baruch College & Universitat Pompeu Fabra

Can a mere gesture lead to intimate product bonding? In this research, we find that affectionate gestures (e.g. hugging, stroking) can serve as routes to object attachment. We suggest that the mere execution of an affectionate gesture can generate emotional attachment, which translates into enhanced product attitudes. However, this effect is contingent on the existence of facilitating conditions via the presence of humanlike characteristics in the target object of the affectionate gesture.


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