Articles

An Integrated Model of Waste Management Behavior: A Test of Household Recycling and Composting Intentions

P. A. TODD, S. TAYLOR

Environment and Behavior

septembre 1995, vol. 27, n°5, pp.603-630

Départements : Informations Systems and Operations Management

http://eab.sagepub.com/content/27/5/603.short


This study examines the antecedents of recycling and composting intentions in the context of an integrated waste management behavior model. This model incorporates a wide variety of important factors from previous research on environmental behavior. The theory of planned behavior provides a theoretical framework to integrate these factors. The model was tested using both recycling and composting data from a sample of more than 700 individuals. Overall, the results suggest that this model fits the data well, helping to explain intentions to engage in recycling and composting

Assessing IT Usage: The Role of Prior Experience

P. A. TODD, S. TAYLOR

MIS Quarterly

décembre 1995, vol. 19, n°4, pp.561-570

Départements : Informations Systems and Operations Management

Mots clés : IT usage, user experience, Technology Acceptance Mode

http://www.jstor.org/stable/249633


A variety of models that incorporate attitudinal, social, and control factors have been advanced to explain IT usage (e.g., Davis, 1989; Davis, et al., 1989; Hartwick and Barki, 1994; Mathieson, 1991; Moore and Benbasat, 1991; Thompson, et al., 1991), of which the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) (Davis, 1989) is the most well known. One goal of such models is to develop diagnostic tools to predict information systems acceptance and facilitate design changes before users have experience with a system (Davis, 1989). However, empirical tests of these models have generally focused on either systems that were already in use by the study participants, or systems that the participants were familiar with, such as word processing packages and spreadsheets. Given this, it is unclear: (1) whether models such as TAM are predictive of behavior for inexperienced users and, more importantly, (2) whether the determinants of IT usage are the same for experienced and inexperienced users of a system. To address these issues, this paper reports on a study of 430 experienced and 356 inexperienced potential users of an IT system--specifically, a student computing information resource center. Using an augmented version of TAM that incorporates social influences and behavioral control, the experienced and inexperienced user groups are compared. To address issue (1) above, the model was tested to show whether it provides an equivalent understanding of usage for both groups. Then to test issue (2), specific paths in the model were compared between the two groups. The overall goal of this research is to assess the efficacy of the augmented TAM in helping, a priori, to understand the behavior of inexperienced users

Decomposition and Crossover Effects in the Theory of Planned Behavior: A Study of Consumer Adoption

P. A. TODD

International Journal of Research in Marketing

juillet 1995, vol. 12, n°2, pp.137-156

Départements : Informations Systems and Operations Management

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/016781169400019K


The Theory of Planned Behavior, an extension of the well-known Theory of Reasoned Action, is proposed as a model to predict consumer adoption intention. Three variations of the Theory of Planned Behavior are examined and compared to the Theory of Reasoned Action. The appropriateness of each model is assessed with data from a consumer setting. Structural equation modelling using maximum likelihood estimation for the four models revealed that the traditional forms of the Theory of Reasoned Action and the Theory of Planned Behavior fit the data adequately. Decomposing the belief structures and allowing for crossover effects in the Theory of Planned Behavior resulted in improvements in model prediction. The application of each model to theory development and management intervention is explored

La production au plus juste ou une nouvelle vision du coût complet

G. BAGLIN

Revue Française de Comptabilité

avril 1995, n°266, pp.59-65

Départements : Informations Systems and Operations Management


Les modes de gestion de la performance dans les chaînes hôtelières françaises

V. MALLERET, G. BAGLIN

Revue Française de Comptabilité

juin 1995, n°268, pp.47-56

Départements : Comptabilité et Contrôle de Gestion, Informations Systems and Operations Management


On the Use, Usefulness and Ease of Use of Structural Equation Modelling in MIS Research: A Note of Caution

P. A. TODD, W. CHIN

MIS Quarterly

juin 1995, vol. 19, n°2, pp.237-246

Départements : Informations Systems and Operations Management

Mots clés : Technology acceptance model, structural equation modeling, confirmatory factor analysis

http://www.jstor.org/stable/249690


The Evolution of Information Systems Positions- 1970-1990: A Content Analysis of the Technical and Managerial Components of I.S. Job Descriptions

P. A. TODD, J. MCKEEN, B. GALLUPE

MIS Quarterly

mars 1995, vol. 19, n°1, pp.1-27

Départements : Informations Systems and Operations Management

Mots clés : Information systems jobs, job skills, job advertisements, content analysis

http://misq.org/cat-articles/the-evolution-of-is-job-skills-a-content-analysis-of-is-job-advertisements-from-1970-1990.html


Changes in the knowledge and skill requirements of information systems (IS) positions were examined by analyzing the content of advertisements for IS professionals placed in four major newspapers over the 20-year period 1970-1990. Three types of jobs were examined: programmers, systems analysts, and IS managers. The analysis of the frequency of phrases in these advertisements suggests that job ads for programmers have changed very little -- technical requirements remain high, and business and systems knowledge requirements remain relatively low (although the frequency of mention of business requirements has increased somewhat). IS management positions are also relatively stable (as relected in the makeup of job ads) from the standpoint that business knowledge requirements have remained high, with technical and systems requirements specified less frequently. The greatest transition in specified job requirements over this 20-year period has occurred for systems analysts. Although this is perhaps not surprising, the nature of this transition is. Contrary to expectations, the relative frequency and proportion of stated technical knowledge requirements in ads have increased dramatically, while the relative frequency of business and systems knowledge requirements has actually decreased slightly.These results raise questions concerning the implicit understanding by academics and practioners alike of the need for business knowledge on the part of systems analysts and other IS professionals. Various interpretations of these findings are provided, and the implications for both education and recruitment are discussed

Turnpikes in Flow Control Models of Unreliable Manufacturing Systems

C. VAN DELFT, A. Haurie

European Journal of Operational Research

20 avril 1995, vol. 82, n°2, pp.359-372

Départements : Informations Systems and Operations Management, GREGHEC (CNRS)


Understanding Household Garbage Reduction Behavior: A Test of an Integrated Model

P. A. TODD, S. TAYLOR

Journal of Public Policy & Marketing

automne 1995, vol. 14, n°2, pp.192-204

Départements : Informations Systems and Operations Management

http://www.jstor.org/stable/30000128


The authors examine the antecedents of household garbage reduction behavior in the context of an integrated waste management behavior model. This model incorporates a wide variety of important factors from previous research on environmental behavior into a single theoretical framework provided by the Theory of Planned Behavior The model was tested using data from a sample of over 1400 individual respondents, each of whom completed a survey and a two-week diary of his or her waste management behaviors. Overall, the results suggest that this model fits the data well and provides significant insight into the factors that influence waste reduction behavior The authors draw public policy implications from the results

Understanding Information Technology Usage: A Test of Competing Models

P. A. TODD, S. TAYLOR

Information Systems Research

juin 1995, vol. 6, n°2, pp.144-176

Départements : Informations Systems and Operations Management

Mots clés : information technology usage ; technology acceptance model ; theory of planned behavior ; innovation characteristics


The Technology Acceptance Model and two variations of the Theory of Planned Behavior were compared to assess which model best helps to understand usage of information technology. The models were compared using student data collected from 786 potential users of a computer resource center. Behavior data was based on monitoring 3,780 visits to the resource center over a 12-week period. Weighted least squares estimation revealed that all three models performed well in terms of fit and were roughly equivalent in terms of their ability to explain behavior. Decomposing the belief structures in the Theory of Planned Behavior provided a moderate increase in the explanation of behavioral intention. Overall, the results indicate that the decomposed Theory of Planned Behavior provides a fuller understanding of behavioral intention by focusing on the factors that are likely to influence systems use through the application of both design and implementation strategies


JavaScriptSettings