Articles

A Framework for Stakeholder Oriented Mindfulness: Case of RFID Implementation at YCH Group

T. S. H. Teo, S. C. SRIVASTAVA, C. Ranganathan, J. W. K. Loo

European Journal of Information Systems

mars 2011, vol. 20, n°2, pp.201-220

Départements : Information Systems and Operations Management, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : RFID, YCH Group, Mindfulness, Stakeholder, Implementation


Implementation of innovative technology in organizations is often fraught with challenges. Past literature on mindfulness suggests that mindful implementation of innovative solutions facilitates success and enhances effectiveness for the organization. Integrating insights from the mindfulness and stakeholder perspectives, we present and analyze a longitudinal case study of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) implementation at YCH Group, a leading logistics provider in the Asia-Pacific region. Our objectives are to examine key attributes of mindfulness as well as identify specific organizational routines that fostered mindfulness at YCH that ultimately paved the way for effective implementation of RFID technology. Important lessons can be learnt from how YCH instituted organizational routines that enabled them to mindfully implement RFID, by explicitly considering both internal and external stakeholders

A Newsvendor Model with Initial Inventory and Two Salvage Opportunities

C. VAN DELFT, A. Cheaitou, Z. Jemai, Y. Dallery

Journal on Systemics, Cybernetics and Informatics

2011, vol. 9, n°3, pp.30-36

Départements : Information Systems and Operations Management, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Newsvendor model, Initial inventory, Lost sales, Salvage opportunities, Concave optimisation and threshold levels


In this paper, we develop an extension of the newsvendor model with initial inventory. In addition to the usual quantity ordered at the beginning of the horizon and the usual quantity salvaged at the end of the horizon, we introduce a new decision variable: a salvage opportunity at the beginning of the horizon, which might be used in the case of high initial inventory level. We develop the expression of the optimal policy for this extended model, for a general demand distribution. The structure of this optimal policy is particular and is characterized by two threshold levels. Some managerial insights are given via numerical examples.

A Petri Net Approach to Analyzing Behavioral Compatibility and Similarity of Web Services

X. LI, Y. FAN, Q. Z. SHENG, Z. MAAMAR, H. ZHU

IEEE Transactions on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics - A

2011, vol. 41, n°3, pp.510-521

Départements : Information Systems and Operations Management, GREGHEC (CNRS)


A Similarity-Based Approach to Prediction

I. GILBOA, O. Lieberman, D. Schmeidler

Journal of Econometrics

mai 2011, vol. 162, n°1, pp.124-131

Départements : Economie et Sciences de la décision, GREGHEC (CNRS)


Assume we are asked to predict a real-valued variable yt based on certain characteristics xt = (x1t , . . . , xdt), and on a database consisting of (x1i, . . . , xdi , yi) for i = 1, . . . , n. Analogical reasoning suggests to combine past observations of x and y with the current values of x to generate an assessment of y by similarity-weighted averaging. Specifically, the predicted value of y, yst , is the weighted average of all previously observed values yi, where the weight of yi, for every i = 1, . . . , n, is the similarity between the vector x1t, . . . , xdt, associated with yt , and the previously observed vector, x1i , . . . , xdi. The ''empirical similarity'' approach suggests estimation of the similarity function from past data. We discuss this approach as a statistical method of prediction, study its relationship to the statistical literature, and extend it to the estimation of probabilities and of density functions.Keywords:Density estimationEmpirical similarityKernelSpatial models

A taxonomy of the perceived benefits of accrual accounting and budgeting: Evidence from German states

T. Jagalla, S. D. BECKER, J. Weber

Financial Accountability & Management

mai 2011, vol. 27, n°2, pp.134-165

Départements : Comptabilité et Contrôle de Gestion, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Accrual Output-Based Budgeting, Accrual accounting, Budgeting, Benefits, Taxonomy, Germany

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1815806


Accrual Output-Based Budgeting (AOBB) in government has been disputed intensely among academics and practitioners. While normative, conceptual, or theory-based literature made promising claims about which benefits can be expected from reforming government accounting and budgeting, recent empirical research finds that at least some of these expectations have been massively overstated. The observed gap between promises and reality poses the question for the true benefits anew. Basing our analysis on practitioners' judgment, we suggest a general and prioritized landscape of perceived benefits (taxonomy). Our findings are derived from 42 interviews conducted in the context of two German federal states. Mapping our results to prior claims in the literature, we reveal that the practitioners interviewed do not see upsides in areas that former research deems to be important while other and previously not emphasized areas, such as mindset changes, seem to convince in practical life. The results of our analysis offer a profound basis for further exploration of the benefits and/or even cost/benefit evaluations. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

A Trust-Based Approach to Selection of Business Services

S. LI, Y. FAN, X. LI

International Journal of Computer Integrated Manufacturing

2011, vol. 24, n°8, pp.769-784

Départements : Information Systems and Operations Management, GREGHEC (CNRS)


Aggregation of multiple prior opinions

H. Crès, I. GILBOA, N. VIEILLE

Journal of Economic Theory

novembre 2011, vol. 146, n°6, pp.2563-2582

Départements : Economie et Sciences de la décision, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Aggregation of opinions, Ambiguity, Multiple priors


Experts are asked to provide their advice in a situation of uncertainty. They adopt the decision maker's utility function, but each has a potentially different set of prior probabilities, and so does the decision maker. The decision maker and the experts maximize the minimal expected utility with respect to their sets of priors. We show that a natural Pareto condition is equivalent to the existence of a set ¿ of probability vectors over the experts, interpreted as possible allocations of weights to the experts, such that (i) the decision maker's set of priors is precisely all the weighted-averages of priors, where an expert's prior is taken from her set and the weight vector is taken from ¿; (ii) the decision maker's valuation of an act is the minimal weighted valuation, over all weight vectors in ¿, of the experts' valuations

Ambiguity Models and the Machina Paradoxes

L. Placido, O. L'HARIDON, A. Baillon

American Economic Review

juin 2011, vol. 101, n°4, pp.1547-1560

Départements : GREGHEC (CNRS)


mail de Marc le 21/01/2010Machina (2009) introduced two examples that falsify Choquet expected utility, presently one of the most popular models of ambiguity. This article shows that Machina's examples falsify not only the model mentioned, but also four other popular models for ambiguity of the literature, namely maxmin expected utility, variational preferences, ??-maxmin, and the smooth model of ambiguity aversion. Thus, Machina's examples pose a challenge to most of the present field of ambiguity. Finally, the paper discusses how an alternative representation of ambiguity-averse preferences works to accommodate the Machina paradoxes and what drives the results. *UTILITY theory *RATE of return *ECONOMICS -- Research *UTILITY functions EXPECTED utility AMBIGUITY

An On-line Process Model of Second-Order Cultivation Effects: How Television Cultivates Material Values and Its Consequences for Life Satisfaction

Lj SHRUM, J. LEE, J. BURROUGHS, A. RINDFLEISCH

Human Communication Research

janvier 2011, vol. 37, n°1, pp.34-57

Départements : Marketing, GREGHEC (CNRS)


Two studies investigated the interrelations among television viewing, materialism, and life satisfaction, and their underlying processes. Study 1 tested an online process model for television’s cultivation of materialism by manipulating level of materialistic content. Viewing level influenced materialism, but only among participants who reported being transported by the narrative, supporting a processmodel in which cultivation effects for valuejudgments occur online during viewing. Study 2 further investigated television’s cultivation of materialism and its consequences for life satisfaction. A survey of U.S. respondents found cultivation effects for materialism and life satisfaction, and materialism mediated the cultivation effect for life satisfaction, suggesting that television’s specific cultivation of materialism (proximal effect) mediates a more general cultivation effect for life satisfaction (distal effect).

Art and Money

W. Goetzmann, L. Renneboog, C. SPAENJERS

American Economic Review

mai 2011, vol. 101, n°3, pp.222-226

Départements : Finance, GREGHEC (CNRS)

http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1501171


This paper investigates the impact of equity markets and top incomes on art prices. Using a newly constructed art market index, we demonstrate that equity market returns have had a significant impact on the price level in the art market over the last two centuries. We also find evidence that an increase in income inequality may lead to higher prices for art. Finally, the results of Johansen's cointegration tests strongly suggest the existence of a long-run relation between top incomes and art prices


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