Articles

A desire for deviance: The influence of leader normativeness and inter-group competition on group member support

J. W. CHANG, N. TURAN, R. M. CHOW

Journal of Experimental Social Psychology

janvier 2015, vol. 56, pp.36-49

Départements : Management et Ressources Humaines, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Deviance; Leadership; Inter-group competition; Social identity

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S002210311400122X


Does Emotional Intelligence Matter in Interpersonal Processes? The Mediating Role of Emotion Management

J. CHOI, G. CHUNG, S. SUNG, B. NAZIR, S. MOATAZ, J. W. CHANG

Seoul Journal of Business

décembre 2015, vol. 21, n°2, pp.45-70

Départements : Management et Ressources Humaines, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Emotional intelligence, Emotion management, Interpersonal behavior, Negotiation


Researchers have identified emotional intelligence (EI) as an importantindividual characteristic that predicts interpersonal effectiveness. In thisstudy, we identified three potential areas of emotion management (emotionexpression, emotion recognition, and shaping counterpart emotion) thatmay be promoted by intrapersonal and interpersonal EI, and may mediatethe effects of EI on interpersonal process and outcomes. Our analysisof data from a dyadic negotiation simulation indicates that EI predictsone aspect of emotion management (shaping counterpart emotion).Intrapersonal EI (but not interpersonal EI) increased counterpart positiveemotion and decreased counterpart negative emotion during the negotiationsimulation. Nevertheless, the overall relationship between EI and emotionmanagement was weak. The present study highlighted the need for clearlyconceptualizing and investigating emotional management through whichindividuals accrue interpersonal and performance benefits

I used to work at Goldman Sachs! How firms benefit from organizational status in the market for human capital

M. BIDWELL, S. WON, R. BARBULESCU, E. MOLLICK

Strategic Management Journal

août 2015, vol. 36, n°8, pp.1164-1173

Départements : Management et Ressources Humaines, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Organizational status, Rent appropriation, Careers, Human capital, Investment banking industry

http://ssrn.com/abstract=2440404


How does employer status benefit firms in the market for general human capital? On the one hand, high status employers are better able to attract workers, who value the signal of ability that employment at those firms provides. On the other hand, that same signal can help workers bid up wages and capture the value of employers' status. Exploring this tension, we argue that high status firms are able to hire higher ability workers than other firms, and do not need to pay them the full value of their ability early in the career, but must raise wages more rapidly than other firms as those workers accrue experience. We test our arguments using unique survey data on careers in investment banking

I used to work at Goldman Sachs! How firms benefit from organizational status in the market for human capital

M. BIDWELL, S. WON, R. BARBULESCU, E. MOLLICK

Strategic Management Journal

aout 2015, vol. 36, n°8, pp.1164-1173

Départements : Management et Ressources Humaines, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Organizational status, Rent appropriation, Careers, Human capital, Investment banking industry

http://ssrn.com/abstract=2440404


How does employer status benefit firms in the market for general human capital? On the one hand, high status employers are better able to attract workers, who value the signal of ability that employment at those firms provides. On the other hand, that same signal can help workers bid up wages and capture the value of employers’ status. Exploring this tension, we argue that high status firms are able to hire higher ability workers than other firms, and do not need to pay them the full value of their ability early in the career, but must raise wages more rapidly than other firms as those workers accrue experience. We test our arguments using unique survey data on careers in investment banking

Team adaptation: A fifteen-year synthesis (1998–2013) and framework for how this literature needs to “adapt” going forward

M. T. MAYNARD, D. M. KENNEDY, A. SOMMER

European Journal of Work & Organizational Psychology

2015, vol. 24, n°5, pp.652-677

Départements : Management et Ressources Humaines, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Teams, Adaptation, Process, Multi-level, Literature review


Organizations increasingly operate within dynamic environments that require them to adapt. To respond quickly and effectively to acute or on-going change, many organizations use teams to help them remain competitive. Accordingly, the topic of team adaptation has become more prominent within the broader organizational team literature. Given the wealth of knowledge that has been accumulated, we consider what has been learned to date. However, even with the increased attention to team adaptation within the literature, not all teams are created equal in terms of their capacity for adaptability. Thus, we review factors that serve as antecedents of team adaptation, the process of adaptation, and the resulting adaptive outcomes. Finally, we suggest future directions for research and practice as we introduce a conceptual framework, whereby the focus of a team’s adaptation process is impacted by the type and severity of the disruption or trigger that gives rise to the need for adaptation

The Strength of Many Kinds of Ties: Unpacking the Role of Social Contacts Across Stages of the Job Search Process

R. BARBULESCU

Organization Science

juillet-août 2015, vol. 26, n°4, pp.1040-1058

Départements : Management et Ressources Humaines, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Job search, Stage process, Matching, External labor market, Careers, Mobility, Managerial jobs, MBA, Occupations, Social contacts, Social networks, Tie strength, Network range


The topic of job mobility has received increasing attention in recent years. Yet, surprising in light of the wealth of research on social networks and job attainment, we do not have a unified model of the impact of different kinds ofsocial contacts on job search success. In this paper I show that contacts are differently beneficial for job seekers depending on the stage of the job search process that job seekers are engaged in. Specifically, three stages of the job search process can be distinguished in which social contacts fulfill different roles for the job seekers: deciding the types of jobs for which to apply, submitting job applications, and preparing for interviews. I propose that contacts who are spread across different occupations are conducive to applying to more types of jobs, yet it is contacts who are more focused across occupations that are beneficial for being invited to more interviews—relative to the number of job types applied for—and for converting the interviews into offers. In addition, contacts with lower relationship depth with the job seeker are more helpful for getting invited to interviews, whereas contacts who have more frequent interactions with the job seeker are more helpful for converting interviews into offers. Analyses using a unique longitudinal data set on the job searches of 226 participants in an MBA program offer robust evidence in support of the hypotheses. The results suggest that external mobility is best enabled when job seekers engage with—and learn from—different kinds of contacts across stages of the job search process


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