Articles

A Legal Analysis of Packaging Standardisation Requirements Under EU Law - The Case of ‘Plain Packaging’ in the United Kingdom

A. ALEMANNO

Journal of Business Law

A paraître

Départements : Droit et fiscalité, GREGHEC (CNRS)


A Mathematical Turn in Business Regulation: The Rise of Legal Indicators

D. RESTREPO AMARILES

International Journal of Law in Context

A paraître

Départements : Droit et fiscalité


Introduction to Global Law, Legal Indicators and Legal Pragmatism

D. RESTREPO AMARILES

Journal of Legal Pluralism and Unofficial Law

A paraître

Départements : Droit et fiscalité


Reinforcing the Public Law Taboo: A Note on Hellenic Republic v Nikiforidis

M. M. WINKLER, E. AVATO

European Law Review

A paraître

Départements : Droit et fiscalité, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : mandatory rules, EU private international law, Rome I Convention, Rome I Regulation


This article hinges on the preliminary ruling rendered by the Court of Justice of the European Union (ECJ) (Grand Chamber) on 18 October 2016 and the related judgment of the German Federal Labour Court of 26 April 2017 in the Nikiforidis case to investigate an area of private international law that is undergoing a substantial development: overriding mandatory provisions. In Nikiforidis, the ECJ excluded that two Greek laws cutting the salary of public employees may be enforced against a teacher working in Germany for the Greek government under an employment contract governed by German law. The question addressed to ECJ was whether said laws were “overriding mandatory provisions” according to the Rome I Regulation. The court denied it, and left to the referring court to determine whether they could nevertheless operate “as matter of fact” under the governing law. This article explains how the ECJ’s conclusion has broader implications by regulating third countries’ interference in international business transactions. Starting with an analysis of the case, the article examines the history and nature of overriding mandatory provisions under EU private international law and argues that the solution embraced by the ECJ leaves room to uncertainty and unpredictability in the operation of foreign mandatory provisions

The Petrilli cases - A new approach of the EU courts in damages claims ?

A. VAN WAEYENBERGE

European Public Law

A paraître

Départements : Droit et fiscalité, GREGHEC (CNRS)


The Whisteblower: An Important Person in Corporate Life?

N. STOLOWY, L. PAUGAM, A. LONDERO

Journal of Business Law

A paraître

Départements : Droit et fiscalité, GREGHEC (CNRS), Comptabilité et Contrôle de Gestion


U.S. Economic Sanctions and the Corporate Compliance of Foreign Banks

D. RESTREPO AMARILES, M. M. WINKLER

The International Lawyer

A paraître

Départements : Droit et fiscalité, GREGHEC (CNRS)


In the last decade, the U.S. has dramatically increased the enforcement of its economic sanctions arsenal against foreign banks. While this arsenal continues to expand, legal scholarship tends to overlook one of its crucial consequences: a radical change in the compliance functions of the targeted banks. In fact, after entering into specific agreements with the U.S. government, non-U.S. banks commit to reforming their compliance functions according to U.S. standards. The depth of the relationship between the extraterritoriality of U.S. laws and banks’ compliance functions demands further inquiry. This article fills that gapby expounding how economic sanctions legislation drives developments in substantial compliance efforts by foreign banks, discussing the current economic sanctions regime and analyzing important enforcement cases. This Article concludes that, as non-U.S. banks manage the heavy burden of U.S. sanctions more deftly than before, a process of Americanization of corporate compliance is underway in the banking industry and beyond


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