Articles

An Integrative Model of the Influence of Parental and Peer Support on Consumer Ethical Beliefs: The Mediating Role of Self-Esteem, Power and Materialism

E. GENTINA, L. SHRUM, T. LOWREY, S. VITELL, G. ROSE

Journal of Business Ethics

A paraître

Départements : Marketing, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Ethics, Adolescent consumers, Materialism, Self-esteem, Power, Peer support, Parental support


What causes adolescents to develop consumer’ ethical beliefs? Prior research has largely focused on the negative influence of peers and negative patterns of parent–child interactions to explain risky and unethical consumer behaviors. We take a different perspective by focusing on the positive support of parents and peers in adolescent social development. An integrative model is developed that links parental and peer support with adolescents’ self-worth motives, their materialistic tendencies, and their consumer ethical beliefs. In a study of 984 adolescents, we demonstrate support for a sequential mediation model in which peer and parental support is positively related to adolescents’ self-esteem and feelings of power, which are each associated with decreased materialism as a means of compensating for low self-worth. This reduced materialism is, in turn, associated with more ethical consumer beliefs

Brand Assets and Pay Fairness as Two Routes to Enhancing Social Capital in Sales Organization

Maria ROUZIOU, Riley DUGAN, Dominique ROUZIES, Dawn IACOBUCCI

Journal of Personal Selling & Sales Management

A paraître

Départements : Marketing, GREGHEC (CNRS)


Payment Evasion

D. HALBHEER, S. BUEHLER, M. LECHNER

Journal of Industrial Economics

A paraître

Départements : Marketing, GREGHEC (CNRS)


The Role of Cultural Communication Norms in Social Exclusion Effects

J. LEE, L.-J. SHRUM, Y. YI

Journal of Consumer Psychology

A paraître

Départements : Marketing, GREGHEC (CNRS)


Uncertainty, Art and Marketing - Searching for the Invisible Hand

R. LAUFER

Philosophy of Management

A paraître, pp.1-24

Départements : Marketing

Mots clés : Institution Art Marketing Legitimacy Pragmatism Uncertainty

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40926-017-0063-0#citeas


The development of art marketing as a new field of management occurs in a context of great confusion as to what constitutes the very definition of art, one aspect of this confusion being nothing else but the confusion between art and marketing itself. This confusion leads to conflicts between those who consider that art should be defined by a clear aesthetic criterion and those who accept the absence of such a criterion as a legitimate consequence of the principle of freedom which applies both to the creation of the artist and to the taste of the public. This state of confusion does not seem to be experienced in the same way in France where it has tended to be considered as a symptom of crisis in the world of art and in the United States where it has raised as a dominant force in contemporary art. Hence the confusion of art and marketing varies as a function of time (as shown by the emergence of a new field of management) and of space (as shown by the comparison of the French and American cases). It will be proposed that it is possible to account for these historical fluctuation thanks to an institutional approach based on the notion of system of legitimacy. We shall propose the essentially dynamic institutional foundations of modernity leading to the proliferation of innovations which consequences are ever more difficult to anticipate as a reason why, in America, philosophers coming from the analytic tradition found it meaningful to address questions such as “What is art” (Arthur Danto) or “When is there art” (Nelson Goodman”) expressing the need to go beyond pragmatism as expressed by John Dewey’s Art as Experience to promote a positive attitude towards contemporary art, while, in France confusion between art and marketing has been commonly considered negatively as the sign of the triumph of the most radical form of rhetoric, i.e. sophism

We look like our names: The manifestation of name stereotypes in facial appearance

Y. ZWEBNER, A.-L. SELLIER, Nir ROSENFELD, Jacob GOLDENBERG, Ruth MAYO

Journal of Personality and Social Psychology

A paraître

Départements : Marketing, GREGHEC (CNRS)


Research demonstrates that facial appearance affects social perceptions. The current research investigates the reverse possibility: Can social perceptions influence facial appearance? We examine a social tag that is associated with us early in life—our given name. The hypothesis is that name stereotypes can be manifested in facial appearance, producing a face-name matching effect, whereby both a social perceiver and a computer are able to accurately match a person’s name to his or her face. In eight studies we demonstrate the existence of this effect, as participants examining an unfamiliar face accurately select the person’s true name from a list of several names, significantly above chance level. We replicate the effect in two countries and find that it extends beyond the limits of socioeconomic cues. We also find the effect using a computer-based paradigm and 94,000 faces. In our exploration of the underlying mechanism, we show that existing name stereotypes produce the effect, as its occurrence is culture-dependent and a function of the name prevalence in society. A self-fulfilling prophecy seems to be at work, as initial evidence shows that facial appearance regions that are controlled by the individual (e.g., hairstyle) are sufficient to produce the effect, and socially using one’s given name is necessary to generate the effect. Together, these studies suggest that facial appearance represents social expectations of how a person with a specific name should look. In this way a social tag may influence one’s facial appearance


JavaScriptSettings