Articles

A Legal Analysis of Packaging Standardisation Requirements Under EU Law - The Case of ‘Plain Packaging’ in the United Kingdom

A. ALEMANNO

Journal of Business Law

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Départements : Droit et fiscalité, GREGHEC (CNRS)


Alliance Formation and Firm Value

G. PACHECO DE ALMEIDA, L. CABRAL

Management Science

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Départements : Stratégie et Politique d’Entreprise, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : firm alliances, matching, competitive advantage


We consider the formation of alliances that potentially create complementarities, that is, when the value function is super-modular in firm resources. We show that, in a frictionless world where information is perfect and managers optimize, firm alliances disproportionately increase the value of high-resource-level firms, resulting in higher variance and higher skewness of the distribution of firm value; moreover, higher-value alliances are subject to regression to the mean at a faster rate. These effects are magnified if the degree of complementarities is endogenously determined by each firm’s investment. We also consider alliances where matching and/or information about firm resources are imperfect, and show that complementarities are a necessary but not sufficient condition for alliances to cause an increase in firm value; and that complementarities are neither a necessary nor a sufficient condition for alliances to be correlated with higher firm value

Ambiguity and the Bayesian Approach

I. GILBOA, M. MARINACCI

Advances in Economics and Econometrics: Theory and Applications

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Départements : Economie et Sciences de la décision, GREGHEC (CNRS)


An analytic calculus for the intuitionistic logic of proofs

B. HILL, F. POGGIOLESI

Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic

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Départements : Economie et Sciences de la décision, GREGHEC (CNRS)


Applying Random Coefficient Models to Strategy Research: Identifying and Exploring Firm Heterogeneous Effects

G. PACHECO DE ALMEIDA

Strategy Science

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Départements : Stratégie et Politique d’Entreprise, GREGHEC (CNRS)


Bank Interest Rate Risk Management

G. VUILLEMEY

Management Science

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Départements : Finance, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Interest rate risk; Derivatives; Bank capital structure; Hedging


Empirically, bank equity value is decreasing in the interest rate. Yet (i) manybanks do not hedge interest rate risk and (ii) above 50% of hedging banks usederivatives to increase exposure. I model a bank’s capital structure, and showthat these facts are consistent with optimal hedging under financial frictions.Novel predictions on the characteristics of banks taking long or short interest ratederivative positions are tested, and supported by the data. Therefore, banks’derivatives exposures are not necessarily evidence of excessive risk-taking, andcan be explained by hedging in the presence of frictions. More broadly, theresults challenge the view that “hedging” and “speculative” positions can beidentified using the comovement between derivatives payoffs and equity value

Banking Deregulation and The Rise in House Price Comovement

A. LANDIER, D. SRAER, D. THESMAR

Journal of Financial Economics

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Départements : Finance, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Financial Integration, Comovement, House Prices

http://faculty.haas.berkeley.edu/dsraer/correlation_final.pdf


The correlation across US states in house price growth increased steadily between 1976 and 2000. This paper shows that the contemporaneous geographic integration of the US banking market, via the emergence of large banks, was a primary driver of this phenomenon. To this end, we first theoretically derive an appropriate measure of banking integration across state pairs and document that house price growth correlation is strongly related to this measure of financial integration. Our IV estimates suggest that banking integration can explain up to one fourth of the rise in house price correlation over this period

Between regulatory field structuring and organizational roles: Intermediation in the field of Sustainable Urban Development

A. MEHRPOUYA

Regulation and Governance

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Départements : Comptabilité et Contrôle de Gestion, GREGHEC (CNRS)


Brokers and Order Flow Leakage: Evidence from Fire Sales

A. BARBON, M. DI MAGGIO, F. FRANZONI, A. LANDIER

The Journal of Finance

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Départements : Finance, GREGHEC (CNRS)


Building the legitimacy of whistleblowers: A multi-case discourse analysis

H. STOLOWY, Y. GENDRON, J. MOLL, L. PAUGAM

Contemporary Accounting Research

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Départements : Comptabilité et Contrôle de Gestion, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Whistleblowing; Fraud detection; Role definition; Discourse analysis; Legitimacy; Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC); Sarbanes-Oxley Act (SOX)


Evidence suggests society still does not view whistleblowers as wholly legitimate – despite legal protections now offered in some jurisdictions, such as the United States. Drawing on a discourse analysis, (i.e., an examination of statements), we investigate the well-publicized stories of seven whistleblowers from 69 sources, including books, first- and second-hand interviews, websites and videos. Our focus is to examine how whistleblower discourses can build legitimacy by more tightly defining the whistleblower role and demonstrating its alignment with social norms. Using whistleblower self-narratives, we identify four narrative patterns: (1) Trigger(s): the event(s) leading to whistleblowing; (2) Personality traits: whistleblower’s morality, resourcefulness, and determination; (3) Constraints: barriers requiring regulatory and organizational change; and (4) Consequences: the longer-term positive impact of the whistleblowing act. These patterns rely on symbolic, analogical, and metaphorical framing to allow others to better understand the role of whistleblowers and enlist their support. Exploring a dataset of 1,621 press articles, we find indications that these narrative patterns resonate in the media – which provide a form of support and may be instrumental in legitimizing the whistleblower role. Grounded on these results, we develop a legitimacy construction model of the whistleblower role, i.e., a representation of how role legitimacy is produced and sustained. From this model, we identify a number of important areas for future research


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