Articles

A desire for deviance: The influence of leader normativeness and inter-group competition on group member support

J. W. CHANG, N. TURAN, R. M. CHOW

Journal of Experimental Social Psychology

janvier 2015, vol. 56, pp.36-49

Départements : Management et Ressources Humaines, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Deviance; Leadership; Inter-group competition; Social identity

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S002210311400122X


A Note on 'Sourcing Decisions with Stochastic Supplier Reliability and Stochastic Demand'

C. VAN DELFT, J.-P. VIAL

Production and Operations Management

octobre 2015, vol. 24, n°10, pp.1636-1639

Départements : Information Systems and Operations Management, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Sourcing, Supplier selection, Random yield

http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2259674


This note complements the study of Burke, Carillo, and Vakharia (2009 hereafter “BCV”) which analyzes a class of single-product multisourcing problems under stochastic demand and random yields. The purpose is twofold. First, we prove that the objective function used by these authors is only a lower bound for the expected profit for which we provide the correct expression. Second, we show on some of the numerical instances provided in BCV's study that the structure and the performance of the BCV ordering policy may be substantially different from the optimal ordering policy. We conclude by giving general qualitative insights characterizing suboptimality of the BCV solution

A world of models: review of Mary S. Morgan, The world in the model: how economists work and think (book review)

I. GILBOA

Journal of Economic Methodology

2015, vol. 22, n°2, pp.235-240

Départements : Economie et Sciences de la décision, GREGHEC (CNRS)


Accounting for business combinations: Do purchase price allocations matter?

L. PAUGAM, P. ASTOLFI, O. RAMOND

Journal of Accounting and Public Policy

juillet-août 2015, vol. 34, n°4, pp.362-391

Départements : Comptabilité et Contrôle de Gestion, GREGHEC (CNRS)

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0278425415000319


Approval Voting and Arrow's Impossibility Theorem

F. MANIQUET, P. MONGIN

Social Choice and Welfare

mars 2015, vol. 44, n°3, pp.519-532

Départements : Economie et Sciences de la décision, GREGHEC (CNRS)


Approval voting has attracted considerable attention in voting theory, but ithasrarelybeeninvestigatedinanArrovianframeworkofcollectivepreference(”socialwelfare”) functions and never been connected with Arrow’s impossibility theorem.The article explores these two directions. Assuming that voters have dichotomouspreferences, it first characterizes approval voting in terms of its collective preferenceproperties and then shows that these properties become incompatible if the collectivepreference is also taken to be dichotomous. As approval voting and majority votinghappen to share the same collective preference function on the dichotomous domain,the positive result also bears on majority voting, and is seen to extend May’s andInada’s early findings on this rule. The negative result is a novel and perhaps surprisingversion of Arrow’s impossibility theorem, because the axiomatic inconsistency herestems from the collective preference range, not the individual preference domain

Approximate Implementation In Markovian Environments

T. TOMALA, L. RENOU

Journal of Economic Theory

septembre 2015, vol. 159, Part A, pp.401-442

Départements : Economie et Sciences de la décision, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Implementation, Approximation, Undetectability, Efficiency, Dynamic, Mechanism Design, Markov Processes

http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2267373


This paper considers dynamic implementation problems in environments with changing private information (according to Markov processes). A social choice function is approximately implementable if it is correctly implemented an arbitrary large number of times with arbitrary high probability in all (communication) equilibria. We show that if a social choice function is strictly efficient in the set of social choice functions that satisfy an undetectability condition, then it is approximately implementable

Asset Divestment as a Response to Media Attacks in Stigmatized Industries

R. DURAND, J.-P. VERGNE

Strategic Management Journal

août 2015, vol. 36, n°8, pp.1205-1223

Départements : Stratégie et Politique d’Entreprise, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Stigma, Impression management, Divestment, Media, Categories, Reputation, Defense industry

http://ssrn.com/abstract=2415019


In stigmatized industries characterized by social contestation, hostile audiences, and distancing between industry insiders and outsiders, firms facing media attacks follow different strategies from firms in uncontested industries. Because firms avoid publicizing their tainted-sector membership, when threatened, they can respond by divesting assets from that industry. Our analyses of the arms industry demonstrate that media attacks on the focal firm and its peers both increase the likelihood of divestment for the focal firm. Specifically, attacks on the focal firm are the most consequential, followed by attacks on peers in the same industry subcategory, and by attacks on peers in different subcategories. These findings shed new light on divestment as a response to media attacks in stigmatized industries and lead us to rethink impression management theory

Attribute-Level Heterogeneity

P. EBBES, J. LIECHTY, R. GREWAL

Management Science

avril 2015, vol. 61, n°4, pp.885-897

Départements : Marketing, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Heterogeneity, Mixture models, Hierarchical Bayes, Conjoint analysis, Reversible-jump MCMC, Segmentation

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1687107


Modeling consumer heterogeneity helps practitioners understand market structures and devise effective marketing strategies. In this research we study finite mixture specifications for modeling consumer heterogeneity where each regression coefficient has its own finite mixture—that is, an attribute finite mixture model. An important challenge of such an approach to modeling heterogeneity lies in its estimation. A proposed Bayesian estimation approach, based on recent advances in reversible-jump Markov chain Monte Carlo methods, can estimate parameters for the attribute-based finite mixture model, assuming that the number of components for each finite mixture is a discrete random variable. An attribute specification has several advantages over traditional, vector-based, finite mixture specifications; specifically, the attribute mixture model offers a more appropriate aggregation of information than does the vector specification facilitating estimation. In an extensive simulation study and an empirical application, we show that the attribute model can recover complex heterogeneity structures, making it dominant over traditional (vector) finite mixture regression models and a strong contender compared to mixture-of-normals models for modeling heterogeneity

Bridging the Service Divide Through Digitally Enabled Service Innovations: Evidence from Indian Healthcare Service Providers

S. C. SRIVASTAVA, G. SHAINESH

MIS Quarterly

mars 2015, vol. 39, n°1, pp.245-264

Départements : Information Systems and Operations Management, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Developing countries, Digital divide, Healthcare, India, Institutions, Process view, Service divide, Service innovation, Service science, Service systems, Social entrepreneurship, Society


The digital divide is usually conceptualized through goods-dominant logic, where bridging the divide entails providing digital goods to disadvantaged segments of the population. This is expected to enhance their digital capabilities and thus to have a positive influence on the digital outcomes (or services) experienced. In contrast, this study is anchored in an alternative service-dominant logic and posits that viewing the divide from a service perspective might be better suited to the context of developing countries, where there is a huge divide across societal segments in accessing basic services such as healthcare and education. This research views the prevailing differences in the level of services consumed by different population segments (service divide) as the key issue to be addressed by innovative digital tools in developing countries. The study posits that information and communication technologies (ICTs) can be leveraged to bridge the service divide to enhance the capabilities of service-disadvantaged segments of society. But such service delivery requires an innovative assembly of ICT as well as non-ICT resources. Building on concepts from service-dominant logic and service science, this paper aims to understand how such service innovation efforts can be orchestrated. Specifically, adopting a process view, two Indian enterprises that have developed sustainable telemedicine healthcare service delivery models for the rural population in India are examined. The study traces the configurations of three interactional resources—knowledge, technology, and institutions—through which value-creating user-centric objectives of increasing geographical access and reducing cost are achieved. The theoretical contributions are largely associated with unearthing and understanding how the three interactional resources were orchestrated for service-centric value creation in different combinative patterns as resource exploitation, resource combination, and value reinforcement. The analysis also reveals the three distinct stages of service innovation evolution (idea and launch, infancy and early growth, and late growth and expansion), with a distinct shift in the dominant resource for each stage. Through an inductive process, the study also identifies four key enablers for successfully implementing these ICT-enabled service innovations: obsessive customer empathy, belief in the transformational power of ICT, continuous recursive learning, and efficient network orchestration.

Business Partners: Complementary Assets, Financing, and Invention Commercialization

T. ASTEBRO, C. SERRANO

Journal of Economics and Management Strategy

été 2015, vol. 24, n°2, pp.228-252

Départements : Economie et Sciences de la décision, GREGHEC (CNRS)

http://ssrn.com/abstract=2602992


This paper assesses the relative importance of the complementary assets and financial capital that business partners may add to the original inventor-entrepreneur. Projects run by partnerships were five times as likely to reach commercialization as those without business partners, and they had mean revenues approximately 10 times as great as projects run by solo entrepreneurs. These gross differences may be due both to partners impacting business success that is, who the particular partners were, and to selection of the type of project or of whom to select as a partner. After controlling for selection effects and observed/unobserved heterogeneity, the smallest estimate of partners' complementary assets approximately doubles the probability of commercialization and increases expected revenues by 29% at the sample mean. Our findings suggest that a critical policy option to increase commercialization rates and revenues for early-stage businesses is to support the market for finding skilled partners


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