Articles

A Sense of the Magical: Names in Lord Dunsany’s The King of Elfland’s Daughter

C. ROBINSON

Names: A Journal of Onomastics

décembre 2015, vol. 63, n°4, pp.189-199

Départements : Langues et Cultures

Mots clés : Lord Dunsany, The King of Elfland's Daughter, Literary onomastics, Fantasy, Magic in literature


Contributing to the enchantment of the author’s celebrated prose, the names in Lord Dunsany’s best-known novel evoke a world of fairytale, myth, and song; ring true to the characters and places they designate; and fashion themselves into a constellation of correspondences in sound, form, and sense.

L'économie allemande lors du deuxième mandat d'Angela Merkel 2009 - 2013

H. BRODERSEN

Allemagne d'Aujourd'hui

octobre-décembre 2013, n°206, pp.22-32

Départements : Langues et Cultures

http://www.septentrion.com/fr/livre/?GCOI=27574100437500


Phonetic Metaphor and the Limits of Sound Symbolism

C. ROBINSON

Names: A Journal of Onomastics

décembre 2013, vol. 61, n°4, pp.189-199

Départements : Langues et Cultures

Mots clés : Fónagy, Ivan: La Métaphore en phonétique and La Vive voix, Genette, Gérard: Mimologiques: Voyage en Cratylie, Gender in names and acts of nomination, Literary onomastics, Le Guin, Ursula K.: A Wizard of Earthsea and The Tombs of Atuan, Phonetic metaphor, Names in fantasy literature, Sound symbolism


Evocative as it is elusive, the sound-symbolism of names tends to be a highly subjective affair, more the stuff of poetic fancy than objective critical analysis. Literary criticism, however, demands a rigorous and more objective approach, which is precisely what the ideas of Gérard Genette and Ivan Fónagy can provide. Where the former explores the limits of sound symbolism, the latter gives a cogent explanation for how, within those limits, this linguistic phenomenon actually works thanks to what he calls phonetic metaphor. In addition to elaborating a concrete framework in which to study the relations between sound and sense in literary onomastics, Fónagy’s ideas open up new vistas for exploring the relationships between names, gender, affect and the body. Names in the fantasy novels of Ursula K. Le Guin illustrate the explanatory power of phonetic metaphor as a critical concept in onomastics

What Makes the Names of Middle-earth So Fitting? Elements of Style in the Namecraft of J. R. R. Tolkien

Christopher ROBINSON

Names: A Journal of Onomastics

juin 2013, vol. 61, n°2, pp.65-74

Départements : Langues et Cultures

Mots clés : J. R. R. Tolkien, Literary onomaturgy, Literary onomastics, Names in fantasy literature


What makes a name ‘fitting’? Or, in closely related formulations, what makes a name ‘sound right’ or ‘ring true’? From the Cratylus to present-day studies in literary onomastics, the usual answer is that a name is fitting, right, or true for the person, place, or thing that bears it. The names in J. R. R. Tolkien’s fiction are fitting in this sense, reflecting by way of their source words, sound symbolism, or etymology some characteristic of their designees. At the same time, however, Tolkien insists that a name fit not only its designee, but also the phonological and morphological style of the nomenclature to which it belongs, as well as the linguistic scheme of his invented world. These elements of style are determined at the level of the nomenclature as a whole, independently from concerns with the motivation of individual names. The personal and place names of Middle-earth are thus fitting in more than the usual sense

L'Allemagne et l'euro : de l'Union monétaire à l'Union de stabilité

H. BRODERSEN

Allemagne d'Aujourd'hui

janvier-mars 2012, n°199, pp.10-30

Départements : Langues et Cultures


The Stuff of Which Names are Made: A Look at the Colorful and Eclectic Namecraft of Lord Dunsany

C. L. ROBINSON

Names: A Journal of Onomastics

mars 2012, vol. 60, n°1, pp.26-35

Départements : Langues et Cultures

Mots clés : Dunsany Lord, Onomastics, Linguistic invention, Literary onomaturgy, Names in fantasy and weird fiction, Twentieth-century literature, Anglo-Irish literature


Lord Dunsany’s prolific namecraft provides a rich field for study, but poses difficulties for traditional approaches to names in literature, which typically seek out the hidden meanings or symbolisms of isolated names. An alterna- tive approach is to look for trends in the forms and substances of the author’s inventions as a whole. To this end, Émile Souriau’s threefold typology of neologisms proves useful. In the first category, Dunsany camou- flages pre-existing vocables of diverse origins. In the second, he employs anglicized versions of forms identified with foreign languages and nomen- clatures, though he does not introduce actual foreign sounds. In the third, he constructs names from morphological building blocks. Whether English or foreign, Dunsany divests his source materials of their original referents, yet retains traces of their idiomatic provenance. Colorful and eclectic, his inventions resonate within a mythopoetic encyclopedia of diverse literary, historical, and cultural traditions

A Different Kind of Magic: Revisioning the Figure of the Witch

C. L. ROBINSON

Textes et Genres

2011, vol. 4, pp.447-157

Départements : Langues et Cultures


A Universal Hubbub Wild of Stunning Sounds and Voices all Confused: The Genesis and Degeneration of Speech in Agamben's Infancy and History and Milton's Paradise Lost

C. L. ROBINSON

Tropismes

2011, vol. 17, pp.94-110

Départements : Langues et Cultures


In Infancy and History, Giorgio Agamben describes infancy as a leap across the divide which seperates phone from logos, or voice from discourse. Language is made possible by this very division, a fracture that man himself introduces as he emerges from infancy to become the speaking subject. Infancy thus represents the original dimension of humanity. A similar conception of infancy lies at the heart of John Milton’s Paradise Lost. But where Agamben theorizes on the origins of language, Milton describes the degeneration of voice and discourse. With Satan’s plunge into chaos, he fathoms the destruction of the very foundations of human language and culture, an utter breakdown of the logos into animal noise and affect

Onomaturgy vs. Onomastics: An Introduction to the Namecraft of Ursula K. Le Guin

C. L. ROBINSON

Names: A Journal of Onomastics

septembre 2011, vol. 59, n°3, pp.129-138

Départements : Langues et Cultures

Mots clés : Ursula k. Le Guin, Onomaturgy, Literary onomastics, Aesthetics of invented names, Names in science fiction and fantasy


Where literary onomastics focuses on names in the context of a narrative, literary onomaturgy focuses on ensembles of names that share common features in their construction, over and beyond the texts in which the individual names appear. This approach gives serious consideration to wordplay and free association that other critical perspectives would treat as irrelevant, yet maintains methodological rigor thanks to its model of name creation. It furthermore treats semantic content as an element of construction, on a par with sound and form, that can be displaced from one name to another. While many of these elements get woven into the narratives in which the names appear, others get left out of the texts, but reappear in the fabrication of other names. In Le Guin's namecraft these internominal relationships cut across different texts and imaginary worlds, are open to great variety, and possess aesthetic properties that make the ensembles worthy of study and admiration on their own merits

Childhood Readings and the Genesis of Names in the Earthsea Novels of Ursula K. Le Guin

C. L. ROBINSON

Children's Literature

2010, vol. 38, n°1, pp.92-114

Départements : Langues et Cultures

Mots clés : Childhood, Readings, Genesis, Names, Earthsea, Novels, Ursula, Le Guin


The creation of names in the Earthsea novels is a playful activity that reawakens a childlike sensitivity to the physical elements of speech and writing and revives memories of language-based experiences that include childhood readings and the encounter with foreign words and names, as often appear in juvenile literature


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