Articles

A Configural Approach to Coordinating Expertise in Software Development Teams

S. KUDARAVALLI, S. FARAJ, S. L. JOHNSON

MIS Quarterly

A paraître

Départements : Information Systems and Operations Management, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Software development, software teams, expertise coordination, configuration, centralization, knowledge tacitness, team conflict, coordination success

http://misq.org/a-configural-approach-to-coordinating-expertise-in-software-development-teams.html


Despite the recognition of how important expertise coordination is to the performance of software development teams, understanding of how expertise is coordinated in practice is limited. We adopt a configural approach to develop a theoretical model of expertise coordination that differentiates between design collaboration and technical collaboration. We propose that neither a strictly centralized, top-down model nor a largely decentralized approach is superior. Our model is tested in a field study of 71 software development teams. We conclude that because design work addresses ill-structured problems with diverse potential solutions, decentralization of design collaboration can lead to greater coordination success and reduced team conflict. Conversely, technical work benefits from centralized collaboration. We find that task knowledge tacitness strengthens these relationships between collaboration configuration and coordination outcomes and that team conflict mediates the relationships. Our findings underline the need to differentiate between technical and design collaboration and point to the importance of certain configurations in reducing team conflict and increasing coordination success in software development teams. This paper opens up new research avenues to explore the collaborative mechanisms underlying knowledge team performance.

An Integrated Revenue Management Framework for a Firm's Greening, Pricing and Inventory Decisions

S. A. RAZA, S. RATHINAM, M. TURIAC, L. KERBACHE

International Journal of Production Economics

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Départements : Information Systems and Operations Management, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Environment, Newsvendor problem, Pricing, Market segmentation, Distribution-free approach

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/aip/09255273


There is a growing interest on developing efficient ways of incorporating environmental considerations into business practices in order to meet both consumers' demand for green products/services, and the firms' sustainable profitability. The main contribution of this article is in developing an integrated revenue management framework to address a firm's greening (investment) effort, pricing and inventory decisions. It is assumed that the firm inaugurates a green product along with its existing product. Even though the firm offers both the green and regular product at differentiated prices, the market segmentation as a result of this price differentiation is regarded as imperfect. This imperfect market segmentation causes a demand leakage mainly due to the heterogeneity among the customers' willingness-to-pay. These effects are included in our proposed model and simplified analytical solutions are developed to solve the same. Additional scenarios where a firm experiences a price-dependent stochastic demand with an unknown distribution is also modeled. This scenario is addressed using a distribution-free approach based on Scarf' s rule. The performance of the proposed methods and the significance of the modeling framework are finally corroborated through several simulations. This analysis provides a sustainable environment, production and retailing framework while still augmenting profitability using fundamental tools from revenue management

Herding and Social Media Word-of-Mouth: Evidence from Groupon

X. LI, L. WU

MIS Quarterly

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Départements : Information Systems and Operations Management, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Herding, word-of-mouth, social media, interaction effect, complementarity


Modern online retailing practices provide consumers with new types of real-time information that can potentially increase demand. In particular, showing past product sales information can reduce uncertainty about product quality, inducing consumers to herd. This effect could be particularly salient for experience goods due to their inherent high uncertainty about product quality. Social media word-of-mouth (WOM) can increase product awareness as product information spreads via social media, increasing demand directly and also amplifying existing quality signals such as past sales. This study examines the mechanisms behind the strategy of facilitating herding and the strategy of integrating social media platforms to understand the potential complementarities between the two strategies. We conduct empirical analysis using data from Groupon.com which sells goods in a fast cycle format of “daily deals”. We find that facilitating herding and integrating social media platforms are complements in generating sales, supporting that it is beneficial to combine the two strategies on social media-driven platforms. Furthermore, we find that herding is more salient for experience goods, consistent with our hypothesized mechanisms, while the effect of social media WOM does not differ between experience goods and search goods

Impact of Average Rating on Social Media Endorsement: The Moderating Role of Rating Dispersion and Discount Threshold

X. LI

Information Systems Research

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Départements : Information Systems and Operations Management, GREGHEC (CNRS)


Inventory allocation models for a two-stage, twoproduct, capacitated supplier and retailer problem with random demand

K. LUO, R. BOLLAPRAGADA, L. KERBACHE

International Journal of Production Economics

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Départements : Information Systems and Operations Management, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : supply chain management, inventory management, capacity allocation, heuristic methods

http://ac.els-cdn.com/S0925527316303930/1-s2.0-S0925527316303930-main.pdf?_tid=e3dcdf78-c36d-11e6-ab1d-00000aacb362&acdnat=1481878922_0f8e1cce572aa5799576c97c7d14f216


The objective of this research is to develop an optimal inventory allocation methodology for a supply chain consisting of a capacitated retailer with limited shelf space, and two unreliable capacitated suppliers in an uncertain environment. We develop conceptual and analytical models that provide allocation preferences between shelf-space and warehouse in both deterministic and stochastic demand cases, and develop managerial insights based on them. For each case, we provide both a closed-form solution and a heuristic method, and illustrate the bounds on the optimal solution. Further, we show that the cost function is L-convex in some cases. Finally, we prove that the expected profit decreases as the variance of demand increases

Priority optimization and make-to-stock/make-to-order decision in multiproduct manufacturing systems

K. Hadj Youssef, C. VAN DELFT, Y. Dallery

International Transactions in Operational Research

A paraître, pp.1-21

Départements : Information Systems and Operations Management, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : make-to-stock (MTS); make-to-order (MTO); priority level; heterogeneous multiproduct produc-tion/inventory system; queuing model


We consider a single-stage multiproduct manufacturing facility producing a large number of end products.In order to reduce overall inventory costs, an efficient approach is to produce some items according to amake-to-stock (MTS) policy and others according to a make-to-order (MTO) policy. Items priority levelsplay a key role in the optimal MTO/MTS decisions for such typical large-scale systems. To tackle this issue,the manufacturing facility is modeled as a multiproduct multipriority classes queuing system. We proposea general optimization procedure that selects near-optimal priority classes, gives the associated flow controlmode (MTO or MTS) for each product, and provides a lower bound and an upper bound with respect to theoptimal cost. First, we illustrate efficiency of our optimization procedure for this class of nonlinear integerprograms via several examples and by a numerical analysis, including a comparison with two alternativeheuristics given in the literature. In addition, we provide managerial insights by exhibiting, under variousparameter settings, the significant impact of an efficient priority level allocation among items on the inventorycosts and on optimal splitting between MTO and MTS product

Social Presence in Virtual World Collaboration: An Uncertainty Reduction Perspective Using a Mixed Methods Approach

S. C. SRIVASTAVA, S. CHANDRA

MIS Quarterly

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Départements : Information Systems and Operations Management, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Virtual worlds, uncertainty reduction theory, institutional trust, sequential mixed methods

http://www.misq.org/skin/frontend/default/misq/pdf/Abstracts/11914_RA_SrivastavaAbstract.pdf


The life-like collaborative potential offered by virtual worlds (VWs) has sparked significant interest for companies to experiment with VWs in order to organize convenient, cost-effective virtual global workplaces. Despite the initial hype, recent years have witnessed a rather stagnant use of VWs for collaboration in organizations. Previous research recognizes that the inherent uncertainties within the VW environment are factors limiting their utilization by businesses. Hence, grounding this research in uncertainty reduction theory (URT), we aim to understand the modalities and mechanisms for mitigating the uncertainties and fostering user trust within VWs so that they can be effectively utilized as a workplace collaboration tool. With this end in view, we propose contextualizing and extending McKnight et al.’s (2002) institutional trust framework to the context of VWs by examining the significant role that social presence has in influencing the efficacy of the institution-based trust-building factors of situational normality and structural assurance in VWs. Using a sequential mixed methods approach (Venkatesh et al. 2013; Venkatesh et al. 2016), this research integrates results from a quantitative study with findings from a qualitative study to arrive at rich and robust inferences and meta-inferences, with the qualitative method first corroborating the inferences obtained from the quantitative research and then complementing them by identifying boundary conditions that may limit the use of VWs in organizations for workplace collaboration. The results together suggest not only the direct, but also the interactional (complementary and substitutive) influences of social presence on the relationships of the two institutional-trust-building factors to user trust in VWs

Analyzing Degree of Parallelism for Concurrent Timed Workflow Processes With Shared Resources

Yanhua DU, Li WANG, X. LI

IEEE Transactions on Engineering Management

février 2017, vol. 64, n°1, pp.42 - 56

Départements : Information Systems and Operations Management, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Business, Servers, Computational modeling, Uncertainty, Analytical models, Processor scheduling, workflow management, Business process management, degree of parallelism, Petri net (PN), timed workflow net (TWF-Net)

http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/7778113/


Degree of parallelism is an important factor in workflow process management, because it is useful to accurately estimate the server costs and schedule severs in workflow processes. However, existing methods that are developed to compute degree of parallelism neglect to consider activities with uncertain execution time. In addition, these methods are limited in dealing with the situation where activities in multiple concurrent workflow processes use shared resources. To address the limitations, we propose a new approach to analyzing degree of parallelism for concurrent workflow processes with shared resources. Superior over the existing methods, our approach can compute degree of parallelism for multiple concurrent workflow processes that have activities with uncertain execution time and shared resources. Expectation degree of parallelism is useful to estimate the server costs of the workflow processes, and maximum degree of parallelism can guide managers to allocate severs or virtual machines based on the business requirement. We demonstrate the application of the approach and evaluate the effectiveness in a real-world business scenario.

Developing knowledge from entrepreneurial actions – toward a taxonomy

T. PARIS, S. JOUINI, S. BUREAU

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development

2017, vol. 24, n°4, pp.793-813

Départements : GREGHEC (CNRS), Information Systems and Operations Management

Mots clés : Experiential learning, Qualitative method, Knowledge development, Entrepreneurial learning

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/pdfplus/10.1108/JSBED-10-2016-0155


Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to enrich our understanding of entrepreneurs’ daily deeds, tasks and activities. The research investigates the ways in which entrepreneurs seize opportunities and gain knowledge from the start to the expansion of their ventures.Design/methodology/approach – Two case studies were developed based on a longitudinal fine-grained analysis of two ventures over two years. Entrepreneurs’ success and learning were modeled in line with grounded theory methodology. Data were collected from both primary and secondary sources in the form of semi-structured interviews and archival documentation.Findings – The authors develop an original conceptual framework that consists of ten entrepreneurial learning opportunities and four knowledge development modes. There are ten generic types of actions that entrepreneurs take. There are then four distinctive ways to transform these experiences into knowledge. The model is assessed in absolute terms and relatively to existing taxonomies.Research limitations/implications – The findings question the premises on which entrepreneurial learning research traditionally relies. Opportunities can be open-ended rather than purely instrumental. Similarly, knowledge can be emerging as much as it can be espoused. This opens-up space for further research.Practical implications – For practitioners, the findings suggest new ways for making sense of the daily experience of their entrepreneurial endeavor. The learning modes suggested can be used by coaches and mentors when helping entrepreneurs in their venture.Originality/value – The research provides empirical evidence of what entrepreneurs do. This may help cast traditional debates about what there is to do (logical necessity) and what there is to know (a priori knowledge) in a new light.

Pricing and Capacity Allocation for Shared Services

V. KOSTAMI, D. KOSTAMIS, S. ZIYA

Manufacturing & Service Operations Management

printemps 2017, vol. 19, n°2, pp.230-245

Départements : Information Systems and Operations Management

Mots clés : customer mix; customer interaction; price discrimination; capacity allocation; shared services

http://pubsonline.informs.org/doi/abs/10.1287/msom.2016.0606


We study the pricing and capacity allocation problem of a service provider who serves two distinct customer classes. Customers in each class are inherently heterogeneous in their willingness to pay for service, but their utilities are also affected by the presence of other customers in the system. Specifically, customer utilities depend on how many customers are in the system at the time of service as well as who these other customers are. We find that if the service provider can price discriminate between customer classes, pricing out a class, i.e., operating an exclusive system, can sometimes be optimal and depends only on classes’ perceptions of each other. If the provider must charge a single price, an exclusive system is even more likely. We extend our analysis to a service provider who can prevent class interaction by allocating separate capacity segments to the two customer classes. Under price discrimination, allocating capacity is optimal if the “net appreciation” between classes, as defined in the paper, is negative. However, under a single-price policy, allocating capacity can be optimal even if this net appreciation is positive. We describe in detail how the nature of asymmetry in classes’ perception of each other determines the optimal strategy


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