Articles

An Integrative Model of the Influence of Parental and Peer Support on Consumer Ethical Beliefs: The Mediating Role of Self-Esteem, Power and Materialism

E. GENTINA, L. SHRUM, T. LOWREY, S. VITELL, G. ROSE

Journal of Business Ethics

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Départements : Marketing, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Ethics, Adolescent consumers, Materialism, Self-esteem, Power, Peer support, Parental support


What causes adolescents to develop consumer’ ethical beliefs? Prior research has largely focused on the negative influence of peers and negative patterns of parent–child interactions to explain risky and unethical consumer behaviors. We take a different perspective by focusing on the positive support of parents and peers in adolescent social development. An integrative model is developed that links parental and peer support with adolescents’ self-worth motives, their materialistic tendencies, and their consumer ethical beliefs. In a study of 984 adolescents, we demonstrate support for a sequential mediation model in which peer and parental support is positively related to adolescents’ self-esteem and feelings of power, which are each associated with decreased materialism as a means of compensating for low self-worth. This reduced materialism is, in turn, associated with more ethical consumer beliefs

Beyond the Target Customer: Social Effects of CRM Campaigns

E. ASCARZA, P. EBBES, O. NEDZER, M. DANIELSON

Journal of Marketing Research

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Départements : Marketing, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Customer Relationship Management (CRM), Field experiments, Targeting, Churn, Retention, Mobile


Customer Relationship Management (CRM) campaigns have traditionally focused on maximizing the profitability of the targeted customers. We demonstrate that, in business settings that are characterized by network externalities, a CRM campaign that is aimed at changing the behavior of specific customers propagates through the social network, thereby also affecting the behavior of non-targeted customers. Using a randomized field experiment involving nearly 6,000 customers of a mobile telecommunications provider, we find that the social connections of targeted customers increase their consumption and are less likely to churn due to a campaign that was neither targeted at them nor offered them any direct incentives. We estimate a social multiplier of 1.28. That is, the effect of the campaign on first-degree connections of targeted customers is 28% of the effect of the campaign on the targeted customers. By further leveraging the randomized experimental design we show that, consistent with a network externality account, the increase in activity among the non-targeted but connected customers is driven by the increase in communication between the targeted customers and their connections, making the local network of the non-targeted customers more valuable. Our findings suggest that in targeting CRM marketing campaigns, firms should consider not only the profitability of the targeted customer, but also the potential spillover of the campaign to non-targeted but connected customers

Payment Evasion

D. HALBHEER, S. BUEHLER, M. LECHNER

Journal of Industrial Economics

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Départements : Marketing, GREGHEC (CNRS)


The Role of Cultural Communication Norms in Social Exclusion Effects

J. LEE, L.-J. SHRUM, Y. YI

Journal of Consumer Psychology

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Départements : Marketing, GREGHEC (CNRS)


We look like our names: The manifestation of name stereotypes in facial appearance

Y. ZWEBNER, A.-L. SELLIER, Nir ROSENFELD, Jacob GOLDENBERG, Ruth MAYO

Journal of Personality and Social Psychology

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Départements : Marketing, GREGHEC (CNRS)


Research demonstrates that facial appearance affects social perceptions. The current research investigates the reverse possibility: Can social perceptions influence facial appearance? We examine a social tag that is associated with us early in life—our given name. The hypothesis is that name stereotypes can be manifested in facial appearance, producing a face-name matching effect, whereby both a social perceiver and a computer are able to accurately match a person’s name to his or her face. In eight studies we demonstrate the existence of this effect, as participants examining an unfamiliar face accurately select the person’s true name from a list of several names, significantly above chance level. We replicate the effect in two countries and find that it extends beyond the limits of socioeconomic cues. We also find the effect using a computer-based paradigm and 94,000 faces. In our exploration of the underlying mechanism, we show that existing name stereotypes produce the effect, as its occurrence is culture-dependent and a function of the name prevalence in society. A self-fulfilling prophecy seems to be at work, as initial evidence shows that facial appearance regions that are controlled by the individual (e.g., hairstyle) are sufficient to produce the effect, and socially using one’s given name is necessary to generate the effect. Together, these studies suggest that facial appearance represents social expectations of how a person with a specific name should look. In this way a social tag may influence one’s facial appearance

A multi-cultural study of salespeople's behavior in individual pay-for-performance compensation systems: when managers are more equal and less fair than others

D. ROUZIES, Vincent ONYEMAH, Dawn IACOBUCCI

Journal of Personal Selling & Sales Management

2017, pp.1-15

Départements : Marketing, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : financial incentives; fairness; salespeople; international compensation; culture


In this research, we examine salespeople’s behavior in individual pay-for-performance compensation systems and show how perceived management fairness seems to energize sales employees in some environments but not in others. We use alarge multicountry database of individual-level remuneration for more than 2,500 salespeople across four B2B industrysectors to demonstrate cultural adaptations of the effect of perceived management fairness. The results indicate that topmanagement should be concerned with employees’ perceptions of fairness in addition to the more typical concerns ofcontrol and motivation widely acknowledged in the microeconomics-based sales-force compensation literature. Inparticular, we show that perceptions of management fairness are key to salespeople’s proportion of total pay generated by pay-for-performance formulas.

An Experience-Utility Explanation of the Preference for Larger Assortments

A. AYDINLI, Y. GU, M. PHAM

International Journal of Research in Marketing

2017, vol. 34, n°3, pp.746-760

Départements : Marketing, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Assortment size; Affect; Emotion; Consumer decision making

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0167811617300526


Although choosing from large assortments has often been found to be demotivating, a robust finding in the marketing literature is that consumers generally prefer larger product assortments. Standard explanations for this preference for larger assortments have focused on reason-based considerations revolving around large assortments enabling potentially “better” choices. This paper offers a different and novel, affect-based explanation. We argue that the relative preference for larger assortments is driven in part by the greater experience utility that consumers derive from reviewing such assortments. Because most products are carriers of positive affect, consumers tend to derive greater experience utility from reviewing larger assortments compared to smaller assortments. Support for this general proposition was found across four experimental studies using different strategies to document the role of affect-based experience utility in driving the preference for larger assortments. Theoretical and substantive implications are discussed

Incorporating hidden costs of annoying ads in display auctions

V. STOURM, Eric BAX

International Journal of Research in Marketing

2017, vol. 34, pp.622-640

Départements : Marketing, GREGHEC (CNRS)

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0167811617300071


Media publisher platforms often face an effectiveness-nuisance tradeoff: more annoying ads can be more effective for some advertisers because of their ability to attract attention, but after attracting viewers’ attention, their nuisance to viewers can decrease engagement with the platform over time. With the rise of mobile technology and ad blockers, many platforms are becoming increasingly concerned about how to improve monetization through digital ads while improving viewer experience.We study an online ad auction mechanism that incorporates a charge for ad impact on user experience as a criterion for ad selection and pricing. Like a Pigovian tax, the charge causes advertisers to internalize the hidden cost of foregone future platform revenue due to ad impact on user experience. Over time, the mechanism provides an incentive for advertisers to develop ads that are effective while offering viewers a more pleasant experience. We show that adopting the mechanism can simultaneously benefit the publisher, advertisers, and viewers, even in the short term.Incorporating a charge for ad impact can increase expected advertiser profits if enough advertisers compete. A stronger effectiveness-nuisance tradeoff, meaning that ad effectiveness is more strongly associated with negative impact on user experience, increases the amount of competition required for the mechanism to benefit advertisers. The findings suggest that the mechanism can benefit the marketplace for ad slots that consistently attract many advertisers

When It Could Have Been Worse, It Gets Better: How Favorable Uncertainty Resolution Slows Hedonic Adaptation

Y. YANG, Y. GU, J. GALAK

Journal of Consumer Research

2017, vol. 43, n° 5, pp. 747-768

Départements : Marketing, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : hedonic adaptation, happiness, uncertainty, favorable uncertainty resolution


Thankfully, most product consumption experiences are positive. Unfortunately, however, those positive experiences are not always guaranteed to occur, and defects creep into the consumer experience. Though its assertion runs counter to most prescriptions, the current research proposes that exposing consumers to the mere possibility of these negative experiences, occurring in a consumption sequence increases consumers’ happiness with those experiences overtime. Six studies demonstrate this effect and further show that this effect is driven by hedonic responses as a result of favorable uncertainty resolution. That is, with the mere possibility of a negative experience, a consumer, who actually experiences a positive outcome, is likely to feel relief or pleasantness from not having to experience the negative experience. This research enriches existing literature on hedonic adaptation and uncertainty and has significant implications for consumer behavior

Coping with Loneliness through Materialism: Strategies Matter for Adolescent Development of Unethical Behaviors

E. GENTINA, L. SHRUM, T. LOWREY

Journal of Business Ethics

2016

Départements : Marketing, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Loneliness, Coping strategies, Unethical behaviors, Adolescent consumers, Materialism, Sharing, Age cohort


Engaging in unethical consumption behaviors is an acute societal problem that can have severe consequences for adolescents, and businesses in particular have been accused of making such consumption particularly appealing and accessible. However, the causes of unethical behaviors are not well understood and research on the causes has been mixed. In this research, we investigate the effects of coping strategies for loneliness on adolescents' adoption of unethical behaviors, a topic that business ethics research has not explored. In a large-scale study (n = 409) of adolescents (ages 13-17), we show that whether loneliness leads to the adoption of unethical behaviors depends on the strategies adolescents use to cope with their loneliness: active coping strategies are associated with fewer unethical behaviors, whereas passive coping strategies are associated with more unethical behaviors. In addition, we show that active and passive coping strategies can be executed through consumption practices. We show that the relation between active coping and fewer unethical behaviors is mediated by sharing of possessions, whereas the relation between passive coping strategies and more unethical behaviors is mediated by product acquisition. Finally, we also show that these mediated relations differ as a function of age cohort (grade level). The indirect effect of active coping on fewer unethical behaviors via sharing holds only for middle school adolescents, whereas the indirect effect of passive coping on more unethical behaviors via product acquisition holds only for high school adolescents. We shed new light on both the bright and dark sides of materialism and unethical behaviors, and provide practical implications for research on loneliness, business ethics, and unethical behaviors


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