Articles

France’s Commercial courts: a good example of the administration of justice by ordinary citizens

N. STOLOWY, M. BROCHIER

Journal of Business Law

2017, vol. 1, pp.1-22

Départements : Droit et fiscalité, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Accessto justice; Commercial law; Courts' powers and duties;France; Judges; Legal history

https://1.next.westlaw.com/Document/I23461760B0A411E6B1DFACFF35803E0B/View/FullText.html?navigationPath=Search%2Fv1%2Fresults%2Fnavigation%2Fi0ad6ad3b0000015fc9730919545f7414%3FNav%3DINTERNATIONAL-ANALYTICAL%26fragmentIdentifier%3DI23461760B0A411E6B1DFACF


Commercial courts occupy a highly specific position in the French judiciary landscape, since their judges are elected.French commercial court judges are not members of the legal professions but business executives and tradespeoplechosen by their peers. This encourages a pragmatic view that takes into account the economic constraints faced by companies. InFrance, certain courts of first instance,such asthe commercial courts, delegate the function of judgment to ordinary citizens, whereas in most courts of first instance, and the appeal courts Cour d’appel and Cour de cassation, only full-time professional magistrates can rule on the cases brought before the court

Italy’s Gentle Revolution: The New Law on Same-Sex Partnerships

M. M. WINKLER

The Digest - National Italian American Bar Association (NIABA) Law Journal

2017, vol. 25, pp.1-31

Départements : Droit et fiscalité, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Italy; Constitutional Law; Human Rights; LGBT Rights

http://heinonline.org/HOL/LandingPage?handle=hein.journals/digst25&div=1&src=home


This Article comments the genesis and the content of the Italian law on civil partnerships between people of the same sex, enacted in May, 2016, and eventually entered into operation, together with a bunch of administrative regulations, in early 2017. As the last country of Western Europe to adopt such a law, the Italian law recognises civil partnerships for same-sex couples but presents several flaws in terms of equality and nondiscrimination based on sexual orientation

James Elliott Construction: a "new(ish) approach" to judicial review of standardisation

A. VAN WAEYENBERGE, D. RESTREPO AMARILES

European Law Review

décembre 2017, vol. 42, n°6, pp.882-893

Départements : Droit et fiscalité, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Construction materials; EU law; Justiciability; Technical standards

https://1.next.westlaw.com/Document/I3EF4FCF0D44E11E7B7FEB158B428CA86/View/FullText.html?navigationPath=Search%2Fv1%2Fresults%2Fnavigation%2Fi0ad6ad3e00000160c5ed5618294cee8b%3FNav%3DINTERNATIONAL-ANALYTICAL%26fragmentIdentifier%3DI3EF4FCF0D44E11E7B7FEB15


This article analyses the decision of the Court of Justice of the European Union in the James Elliot Construction case delivered on 27 October 2016. In its decision, the Court has for the first time affirmed its jurisdiction to interpret harmonised technical standards on a preliminary reference. In this contribution, we argue that the decision marks an important breakthrough in the evolution of EU law by recognising harmonised technical standards as part of Union law. This opening offers new possibilities for litigating technical standards and assuring the centrality of the rule of law in the achievement of the internal market. The article concludes by analysing the implications of the decision in relation to the Meroni doctrine, the potential conflicts between the principle of free access to the acts of the Union and the protection of intellectual property, and the impact that greater litigation over harmonised technical standards may have on the caseload of the Court

Le nouveau droit international privé italien des partenariats enregistrés

M. M. WINKLER, K. T. SCHAPPO

Revue critique de droit international privé

2017, vol. 3, n°Doctrine & Chroniques, pp.319-335

Départements : Droit et fiscalité, GREGHEC (CNRS)

https://www.dalloz-revues.fr/revues/Revue_critique_de_droit_international_prive-30.htm


Une analyse du droit international privé italien en matière de partenariats enregistrés après la loi no. 76 du 2016 et les décrets d'implémentation du janvier 2017

Questionable Transactions, Unquestionable Rules: The Odebrecht/Braskem Case and the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act

L. SCOLLO, M. M. WINKLER

Diritto del Commercio Internazionale

2017, vol. XXXI, n°3, pp.521-542

Départements : Droit et fiscalité, GREGHEC (CNRS)


This article offers a critical analysis of the Odebrecht/Braskem case under theForeign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA ). Two Brazilian companies, Odebrecht S.A.and its subsidiary Braskem S.A., have been caught in a massive bribery machinethat concerned Brazil as well as many other countries, including Switzerland andthe United States. Not only did these companies create a true consortium throughwhich they controlled Brazil’s public procurement system in a way to adjudicateand make profit out of multibillion projects in South America and abroad, but theyalso exploited the U.S. financial market to transfer money to corrupt public officers.The two companies cut a deal with the U.S. prosecutors under the FCPA, which thearticle comments in two parts. First, it recounts the case’s factual background,casting a light on the companies’ business models and corrupt conduct. The secondpart delineates the legal arsenal underlying the deal signed with the U.S. prosecu-tors, which reflects a consolidated practice of the U.S. government to prosecutenon-American multinational enterprises pursuant to the FCPA. Such practice isbased on the broad discretion enjoyed by U.S. federal prosecutors in exercising their prosecutorial power, which includes the possibility to halt or defer theprosecution upon the condition that the defendant pays a penalty and submits to certain compliance and self-reporting obligations. Through the FCPA, they cantarget foreign corporations whose bribery scheme involved, even indirectly, theU.S. financial market. Finally, the Odebrecht/Braskem case represents the firstexample of a deal that was indirectly participated by foreign governments, whosesanctions were considered part of the deal itself

Supping with the Devil? Indicators and the rise of managerial rationality in law

D. RESTREPO AMARILES

International Journal of Law in Context

décembre 2017, vol. 13, n°4, pp.465-484

Départements : Droit et fiscalité

https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/international-journal-of-law-in-context/article/supping-with-the-devil-indicators-and-the-rise-of-managerial-rationality-in-law/EB2ED29AD4B538B801BA322ED639A52C


Managerial devices are rapidly developing as a means for driving the legal performance of organisations, including those of states and corporations. This paper explores the managerial rationality underpinning global legal indicators, and the constraints they convey on institutional behaviour. In particular, it argues that indicators are better understood as part of a system of management control and distributed governance, which is steadily eroding state-centred forms of authority, including state law. In this context, legitimacy and reactivity are contingent to their cycle of production and implementation, which is fourfold: data-collecting, benchmarking, auditing and allocating incentives. Each process is meant to generate respectively subjectification, self-knowledge by comparison, accountability and stimulus for action. Indicators with higher degrees of legitimacy become entrenched in institutional practices and legal decision-making processes. The paper concludes that regulatory spaces where indicators unfold need critical and political scrutiny to expose their pernicious effects, undesirable uses and inevitable misuses

Thinking Justice Outside the Dock: A Critical Assessment of the Reform of the EU's Court System

A. ALEMANNO, L. PECH

Common Market Law Review

février 2017, vol. 54, n°1, pp.129-176

Départements : Droit et fiscalité, GREGHEC (CNRS)


The 2015 reform of the EU’s court system will go down in history as the most radical transformation of the EU judicial architecture since the establishment of the General Court in 1989. It entails not only the doubling of the number of General Court judges but also the dissolution of the Civil Service Tribunal. This article offers a critical assessment of these two major, structural changes, by focusing on both the process by which they were adopted and its overall merits. After providing a detailed examination of its tortuous legislative history and highlighting its unique underlying procedural feature – with the Court itself initiating the reform process -, this article identifies and systematises the major reform’s shortcomings. It criticises both the diagnosis underpinning the reform and the cure administered. It concludes by presenting this reform process as a missed opportunity to address, in a more holistic manner, the pressing non-docket related challenges faced by the EU judicial system and, in particular, to reform a governance structure which is no longer fit for purpose considering the massive transformation of the EU judicial branch since the CJ was first established in 1951

A Comparative Overview of EU and US Legislative and Regulatory Systems: Implications for Domestic Governance & the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership

A. ALEMANNO, R. W. PARKER

Columbia Journal of European Law

hiver 2016, vol. 22, n°1

Départements : Droit et fiscalité, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : TTIP, Regulatory Cooperation, Convergence, Divergence, Mutual Recognition, Equivalence, MRA, US-EU, race to the bottom, direct effect, implementation

https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2721038


The aim of this report is to inform the EU-US Transatlantic Trade and Investment negotiations on enhanced regulatory coherence and cooperation, by providing negotiators, stakeholders and the public with a comparative overview of the US and EU legislative and regulatory processes in their current form, highlighting differences and similarities

Are Criminal Sanctions Always Appropriate in Business Law? The French Example of Combining Civil and Criminal Law

N. STOLOWY

Journal of Business Law

2016, vol. 7, pp.607-623

Départements : Droit et fiscalité, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Commercial law; Corporate liability; Criminal liability; France; Offences; Penalties; White collar crime


Developments in business law have shown a general trend towards autonomy or indeed particularism.French commercial law is not homogeneous in substance, although several laws have been combined and the codification has been unified.1France’s Commercial Code comprises a number of different branches that each claims their own particularism.This codification is an administrative resource. It provides a formal presentation of a discipline, without interfering with its content. In some instances the codification improves the accessibility of information, but the major divisions of commercial law remain, and this does not contribute to overall coherence.The criminal sanctions applicable in business law fall into the scope of a specific criminal law. The groupings have been so artificial that is it sometimes very difficult for these disciplines to display their particularism. For example, different criminal laws have developed in such diverse areas as criminal labour law, criminal consumer law, criminal planning and environment law, criminal tax law which completes criminal company law, and criminal business law which is a counterpart to (and sometimes difficult to distinguish from) criminal economic law.These different branches show up boundaries that are often vague, and relative specificities.3 They are best justified on the level of criminal sociology, since they concern clearly identified actors in the various activities involving exposure to certain risks. General or special classifications have had to be found for those risks.These disciplines have the merit of imposing a constructed coherence on the study of criminal offence classifications relating to the major sectors of economic and corporate activity, in order to secure and moralise those activities.Criminal business law occupies a prominent position owing to the company law logic, to which it claims to be a response, but also owing to the difficulty of clearly determining its legal purpose. Its scope varies depending on the author, and the sociological than a legal reality. It is easier to understand that the aim of criminal sanctions is to bring morality into the world of business when they have a repressive dimension or are imposed by the court to ensure compliance. In this perspective they act as a sword of Damocles, and are more effective than court orders or injunctions, which remain civil law sanctions that have few consequences for the individual, and more importantly can be covered by insurance.Criminal law as applied to business is simply a reflection of the complexity of social relations and the difficulty, not to say impossibility, of finding a dividing line between the human, social and economic activities. The economic activity criterion is doubtless the most relevant. Criminal business law acts as a combined law.After an analysis of the appropriateness or otherwise of the decriminalisation of business law, we study its most typical criminal sanctions.

At Long Last, Italy Moves to Comply With European Human Rights Imperative to Recognize Same-Sex Partners

M. M. WINKLER

Lesbian/Gay Law Notes

juin 2016, vol. 6/2016, pp.226-228

Départements : Droit et fiscalité, GREGHEC (CNRS)



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