Articles

Towards an Integrated Framework of Professional Partnership Performance: the Role of Formal Governance and Strategic Planning

M. LANDER, P. P. M. A. R. HEUGENS, J. VAN OOSTERHOUT

Human Relations

novembre 2017, vol. 70, n°11, pp.1388-1414

Départements : Management et Ressources Humaines, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : client attraction and retention, human capital, managed professional business, professional partnership, reputational capital

http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/0018726717700697


Conventional wisdom identifies human capital and organizational reputation as the critical resources explaining professional partnership (PP) performance. PPs have increasingly adopted organizational practices like strategic planning and formal governance, however, which have long been alien in highly professionalized contexts. In order to test the influence of both these classic resources and the newly adopted practices on PP performance, as well as the mediating mechanisms— that is, client attraction and retention as well as organizational efficiency—through which this influence is channeled, we develop an integrated theoretical framework of PP performance. We test the resulting hypotheses using survey and objective data collected on 196 Dutch law firms. Our findings provide new insights into the drivers of PP performance and the complex interrelationships between PP resources and newly adopted practices

For a dollar, would you...? How (we think) money affects compliance with our requests

V. K. BOHNS, D. NEWARK, A. Z. XU

Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes

mai 2016, vol. 134, pp.45-62

Départements : Management et Ressources Humaines

Mots clés : Compliance; Money; Morality; Prosocial behavior; Social influence; Social prediction

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0749597816302102


Research has shown a robust tendency for people to underestimate their ability to get others to comply with their requests. In five studies, we demonstrate that this underestimation-of-compliance effect is reduced when requesters offer money in exchange for compliance. In Studies 1 and 2, participants assigned to a no-incentive or monetary-incentive condition made actual requests of others. In both studies, requesters who offered no incentives underestimated the likelihood that those they approached would grant their requests; however, when requesters offered monetary incentives, this prediction error was mitigated. In Studies 3–5, we present evidence in support of a model to explain the underlying mechanism for this attenuation effect. Studies 3 and 4 demonstrate that offering monetary incentives activates a money-market frame. In Study 5, we find that this activation reduces the discomfort associated with asking, allowing requesters to more accurately assess the size of their request and, consequently, the likelihood of compliance

Keeping positive and building strength: The role of affect and team leadership in developing resilience during an organizational crisis

A. SOMMER, J. M. HOWELL, C. N. HADLEY

Group and Organization Management

avril 2016, vol. 41, n°2, pp.172-202

Départements : Management et Ressources Humaines

Mots clés : Organizational crisis, Leadership, Emotions, Resilience, Teams, Health care


During an organizational crisis in health care, we collected multilevel data from 426 team members and 52 leaders. The results of hierarchical linear modeling describe the influence of leader behavior on team members’ resilience, which is primarily through affective mechanisms. Specifically, transformational leadership was associated with greater levels of positive affect and lower levels of negative affect, which in turn predicted higher resilience among team members. Inverse effects were found for the passive form of management-by-exception (MBE) leadership. Contrary to expectation, no relationship was found between active MBE leadership and affect. The implications for leaders and team members to foster positive affect and resilience during a crisis are discussed

The Politics of Achievement Gaps: U.S. Public Opinion on Race-Based and Wealth-Based Differences in Test Scores

J. VALANT, D. NEWARK

Educational Researcher

2016, vol. 45, n°6, pp.331-346

Départements : Management et Ressources Humaines

Mots clés : achievement gap; educational policy; equity; experimental research; politics; poverty; race; survey research

http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.3102/0013189X16658447


For decades, researchers have documented large differences in average test scores between minority and White students and between poor and wealthy students. These gaps are a focal point of reformers’ and policymakers’ efforts to address educational inequities. However, the U.S. public’s views on achievement gaps have received little attention from researchers, despite playing an important role in shaping policymakers’ behaviors. Drawing on randomized experiments with a nationally representative sample of adults, we explore the public’s beliefs about test score gaps and its support for gap-closing initiatives. We find that Americans are more concerned about—and more supportive of proposals to close—wealth-based achievement gaps than Black-White or Hispanic-White gaps. Americans also explain the causes of wealthbased gaps more readily

What determines crime rates? An empirical test of integrated economic and sociological theories of criminal behavior

P. ENGELEN, M. LANDER, M. VAN ESSEN

The Social Science Journal

juin 2016, vol. 53, n°2, pp.247-262

Départements : Management et Ressources Humaines, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Crime, Property crime, Violent crime, Deterrence, Integrated model


Research on crime has by no means reached a definitive conclusion on which factors are related to crime rates. We contribute to the crime literature by providing an integrated empirical model of economic and sociological theories of criminal behavior and by using a very comprehensive set of economic, social as well as demographic explanatory variables. We use panel data techniques to estimate this integrated crime model for property and violent crime using the entire population of all 100 counties in North Carolina for the years 2001–2005. Both fields contribute to the explanatory power of the integrated model. Our results support the economic explanation of crime with respect to the deterrent effect of the probabilities of arrest and imprisonment concerns, as well as the time allocation model of criminal activities. In contrast, the integrated model seems to reject the impact of the severity of punishment on crime levels. With respect to the sociological theories of crime, we find most support for the social disorganization theory and for the routine activity theory. Finally, we find differences between property and violent crimes, mostly explained by the sociological models.

A desire for deviance: The influence of leader normativeness and inter-group competition on group member support

J. W. CHANG, N. TURAN, R. M. CHOW

Journal of Experimental Social Psychology

janvier 2015, vol. 56, pp.36-49

Départements : Management et Ressources Humaines, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Deviance; Leadership; Inter-group competition; Social identity

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S002210311400122X


Does Emotional Intelligence Matter in Interpersonal Processes? The Mediating Role of Emotion Management

J. CHOI, G. CHUNG, S. SUNG, B. NAZIR, S. MOATAZ, J. W. CHANG

Seoul Journal of Business

décembre 2015, vol. 21, n°2, pp.45-70

Départements : Management et Ressources Humaines, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Emotional intelligence, Emotion management, Interpersonal behavior, Negotiation


Researchers have identified emotional intelligence (EI) as an importantindividual characteristic that predicts interpersonal effectiveness. In thisstudy, we identified three potential areas of emotion management (emotionexpression, emotion recognition, and shaping counterpart emotion) thatmay be promoted by intrapersonal and interpersonal EI, and may mediatethe effects of EI on interpersonal process and outcomes. Our analysisof data from a dyadic negotiation simulation indicates that EI predictsone aspect of emotion management (shaping counterpart emotion).Intrapersonal EI (but not interpersonal EI) increased counterpart positiveemotion and decreased counterpart negative emotion during the negotiationsimulation. Nevertheless, the overall relationship between EI and emotionmanagement was weak. The present study highlighted the need for clearlyconceptualizing and investigating emotional management through whichindividuals accrue interpersonal and performance benefits

I used to work at Goldman Sachs! How firms benefit from organizational status in the market for human capital

M. BIDWELL, S. WON, R. BARBULESCU, E. MOLLICK

Strategic Management Journal

août 2015, vol. 36, n°8, pp.1164-1173

Départements : Management et Ressources Humaines, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Organizational status, Rent appropriation, Careers, Human capital, Investment banking industry

http://ssrn.com/abstract=2440404


How does employer status benefit firms in the market for general human capital? On the one hand, high status employers are better able to attract workers, who value the signal of ability that employment at those firms provides. On the other hand, that same signal can help workers bid up wages and capture the value of employers' status. Exploring this tension, we argue that high status firms are able to hire higher ability workers than other firms, and do not need to pay them the full value of their ability early in the career, but must raise wages more rapidly than other firms as those workers accrue experience. We test our arguments using unique survey data on careers in investment banking

I used to work at Goldman Sachs! How firms benefit from organizational status in the market for human capital

M. BIDWELL, S. WON, R. BARBULESCU, E. MOLLICK

Strategic Management Journal

aout 2015, vol. 36, n°8, pp.1164-1173

Départements : Management et Ressources Humaines, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Organizational status, Rent appropriation, Careers, Human capital, Investment banking industry

http://ssrn.com/abstract=2440404


How does employer status benefit firms in the market for general human capital? On the one hand, high status employers are better able to attract workers, who value the signal of ability that employment at those firms provides. On the other hand, that same signal can help workers bid up wages and capture the value of employers’ status. Exploring this tension, we argue that high status firms are able to hire higher ability workers than other firms, and do not need to pay them the full value of their ability early in the career, but must raise wages more rapidly than other firms as those workers accrue experience. We test our arguments using unique survey data on careers in investment banking

Magazine Reading Experience and Advertising Engagement: A Uses and Gratifications Perspective

J. KIM, J. W. LEE, S. JO, J. JUNG, J. KANG

Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly

2015, vol. 92(1), n°1, pp.179-198

Départements : Management et Ressources Humaines

Mots clés : Media, Context, Advertisements, Communication, Readership, Predictors, Students, Model, Self

http://jmq.sagepub.com/content/92/1/179.abstract


Guided by the uses and gratifications theory, this study examines the structural relationships between a number of magazine reader experience factors and advertising engagement. The results from a survey of 507 female college students in South Korea suggest that personal experience, a second-order factor consisting of information, personal identification, and entertainment experiences, significantly influences advertising engagement, whereas the other factor, social experience, has no effect on advertising engagement. Theoretical and managerial implications are discussed.


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