Articles

Le management face au judiciaire: Un nouveau domaine d’enseignement et de recherche

R. LAUFER, Y. MULLER-LAGARDE

Revue Française de Gestion

novembre-décembre 2017, vol. 43, n°269, pp.13-19

Départements : Marketing

https://rfg.revuesonline.com/articles/lvrfg/abs/2017/08/rfg00209/rfg00209.html


Payment Evasion

S. BUEHLER, D. HALBHEER, M. LECHNER

Journal of Industrial Economics

décembre 2017, vol. 67, n°4, pp.804-832

Départements : Marketing, GREGHEC (CNRS)

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/joie.2017.65.issue-4/issuetoc


This paper shows that a firm can use the purchase price and the fine imposedon detected payment evaders to discriminate between unobservable con-sumer types. Assuming that consumers self-select into regular buyers andpayment evaders, we show that the firm typically engages in second-degreeprice discrimination in which the purchase price exceeds the expected fine.In addition, we find that higher fines do not necessarily reduce paymentevasion. We illustrate with data from fare dodging on public transportation

Person–Organization Fit and Incentives: A Causal Test

O. ANDERSSON, M. HUYSENTRUYT, T. MIETTINEN, S. UTE

Management Science

2017, vol. 63, n°1, pp.73-96

Départements : Marketing

Mots clés : tournaments; organizational culture; personal values; person–organization fit; teams; economic incentives

https://pubsonline.informs.org/doi/abs/10.1287/mnsc.2015.2331


We investigate the effects of organizational culture and personal values on performance under individual and team contest incentives. We develop a model of regard for others and in-group favoritism that predicts interaction effects between organizational values and personal values in contest games. These predictions are tested in a computerized lab experiment with exogenous control of both organizational values and incentives. In line with our theoretical model, we find that prosocial (proself)-orientated subjects exert more (less) effort in team contests in the primed prosocial organizational values condition, relative to the neutrally primed baseline condition. Further, when the prosocial organizational values are combined with individual contest incentives, prosocial subjects no longer outperform their proself counterparts. These findings provide, to our knowledge, a first, affirmative, causal test of person–organization fit theory. They also suggest the importance of a “triple-fit” between personal preferences, organizational values, and incentive mechanisms for prosocially orientated individuals

Uncertainty, Art and Marketing - Searching for the Invisible Hand

R. LAUFER

Philosophy of Management

novembre 2017, vol. 16, n°3, pp.217–240

Départements : Marketing

Mots clés : Institution, Art, Marketing, Legitimacy, Pragmatism, Uncertainty

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40926-017-0063-0#citeas


The development of art marketing as a new field of management occurs in a context of great confusion as to what constitutes the very definition of art, one aspect of this confusion being nothing else but the confusion between art and marketing itself. This confusion leads to conflicts between those who consider that art should be defined by a clear aesthetic criterion and those who accept the absence of such a criterion as a legitimate consequence of the principle of freedom which applies both to the creation of the artist and to the taste of the public. This state of confusion does not seem to be experienced in the same way in France where it has tended to be considered as a symptom of crisis in the world of art and in the United States where it has raised as a dominant force in contemporary art. Hence the confusion of art and marketing varies as a function of time (as shown by the emergence of a new field of management) and of space (as shown by the comparison of the French and American cases). It will be proposed that it is possible to account for these historical fluctuation thanks to an institutional approach based on the notion of system of legitimacy. We shall propose the essentially dynamic institutional foundations of modernity leading to the proliferation of innovations which consequences are ever more difficult to anticipate as a reason why, in America, philosophers coming from the analytic tradition found it meaningful to address questions such as “What is art” (Arthur Danto) or “When is there art” (Nelson Goodman”) expressing the need to go beyond pragmatism as expressed by John Dewey’s Art as Experience to promote a positive attitude towards contemporary art, while, in France confusion between art and marketing has been commonly considered negatively as the sign of the triumph of the most radical form of rhetoric, i.e. sophism

Using sublexical priming to enhance brand name phonetic symbolism effects in young children

S. M. BAXTER, M. ILICIC, A. KULCZYNSKI, T. LOWREY

Marketing Letters

décembre 2017, vol. 28, n°4, pp.565–577

Départements : Marketing, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Phonetic symbolism . Children . Phonological awareness. Priming . Sublexical

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11002-017-9430-9


We examine whether phonetic symbolism effects are conditional on the development of phonological awareness (an ability to recognize sounds in words). Further, we introduce sublexical priming as a means to enhance phonetic symbolism effects. Across four experiments, we demonstrate that product evaluations, consistent with phonetic symbolism theory, are more (less) likely when a child is older (younger). Specifically, older children who can recognize sounds in words perceive back vowel brand names (e.g., Vopoz) as slower, heavier, larger, smoother, creamier, chewier, and thicker than brand names with front vowel sounds (e.g., Vipiz). In addition, we show that phonetic symbolism effects manifest when younger children (low in phonological awareness) are primed to focus on parts of a word/s, which we term sublexical priming. We present embedded tasks and chunking of brand names as strategic communication techniques that can be implemented as sublexical primes to enhance phonetic symbolism effects in younger children

We look like our names: The manifestation of name stereotypes in facial appearance

Y. ZWEBNER, A.-L. SELLIER, Nir ROSENFELD, Jacob GOLDENBERG, Ruth MAYO

Journal of Personality and Social Psychology

avril 2017, vol. 112, n°4, pp.527-554

Départements : Marketing, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : face perception, naming, self-fulfilling prophecy, social influence, stereotypes

http://psycnet.apa.org/doiLanding?doi=10.1037%2Fpspa0000096


Research demonstrates that facial appearance affects social perceptions. The current research investigates the reverse possibility: Can social perceptions influence facial appearance? We examine a social tag that is associated with us early in life—our given name. The hypothesis is that name stereotypes can be manifested in facial appearance, producing a face-name matching effect, whereby both a social perceiver and a computer are able to accurately match a person’s name to his or her face. In eight studies we demonstrate the existence of this effect, as participants examining an unfamiliar face accurately select the person’s true name from a list of several names, significantly above chance level. We replicate the effect in two countries and find that it extends beyond the limits of socioeconomic cues. We also find the effect using a computer-based paradigm and 94,000 faces. In our exploration of the underlying mechanism, we show that existing name stereotypes produce the effect, as its occurrence is culture-dependent and a function of the name prevalence in society. A self-fulfilling prophecy seems to be at work, as initial evidence shows that facial appearance regions that are controlled by the individual (e.g., hairstyle) are sufficient to produce the effect, and socially using one’s given name is necessary to generate the effect. Together, these studies suggest that facial appearance represents social expectations of how a person with a specific name should look. In this way a social tag may influence one’s facial appearance

When It Could Have Been Worse, It Gets Better: How Favorable Uncertainty Resolution Slows Hedonic Adaptation

Y. YANG, Y. GU, J. GALAK

Journal of Consumer Research

février 2017, vol. 43, n°5, pp.747–768

Départements : Marketing, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : hedonic adaptation, happiness, uncertainty, favorable uncertainty resolution


Thankfully, most product consumption experiences are positive. Unfortunately, however, those positive experiences are not always guaranteed to occur, and defects creep into the consumer experience. Though its assertion runs counter to most prescriptions, the current research proposes that exposing consumers to the mere possibility of these negative experiences, occurring in a consumption sequence increases consumers’ happiness with those experiences overtime. Six studies demonstrate this effect and further show that this effect is driven by hedonic responses as a result of favorable uncertainty resolution. That is, with the mere possibility of a negative experience, a consumer, who actually experiences a positive outcome, is likely to feel relief or pleasantness from not having to experience the negative experience. This research enriches existing literature on hedonic adaptation and uncertainty and has significant implications for consumer behavior

Coping with Loneliness through Materialism: Strategies Matter for Adolescent Development of Unethical Behaviors

E. GENTINA, L. SHRUM, T. LOWREY

Journal of Business Ethics

2016, pp.1-20

Départements : Marketing, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Loneliness, Coping strategies, Unethical behaviors, Adolescent consumers, Materialism, Sharing, Age cohort


Engaging in unethical consumption behaviors is an acute societal problem that can have severe consequences for adolescents, and businesses in particular have been accused of making such consumption particularly appealing and accessible. However, the causes of unethical behaviors are not well understood and research on the causes has been mixed. In this research, we investigate the effects of coping strategies for loneliness on adolescents' adoption of unethical behaviors, a topic that business ethics research has not explored. In a large-scale study (n = 409) of adolescents (ages 13-17), we show that whether loneliness leads to the adoption of unethical behaviors depends on the strategies adolescents use to cope with their loneliness: active coping strategies are associated with fewer unethical behaviors, whereas passive coping strategies are associated with more unethical behaviors. In addition, we show that active and passive coping strategies can be executed through consumption practices. We show that the relation between active coping and fewer unethical behaviors is mediated by sharing of possessions, whereas the relation between passive coping strategies and more unethical behaviors is mediated by product acquisition. Finally, we also show that these mediated relations differ as a function of age cohort (grade level). The indirect effect of active coping on fewer unethical behaviors via sharing holds only for middle school adolescents, whereas the indirect effect of passive coping on more unethical behaviors via product acquisition holds only for high school adolescents. We shed new light on both the bright and dark sides of materialism and unethical behaviors, and provide practical implications for research on loneliness, business ethics, and unethical behaviors

Data Descriptor: Data from a pre-publication independent replication initiative examining ten moral judgement effects

W TIERNEY, M SCHWEINSBERG, A.-L. SELLIER, ET AL.

Nature: Scientific Data

2016, vol. 3, n°160082

Départements : Marketing, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Decision making, Ethics, Psychology, Research management

http://www.nature.com/articles/sdata201682


We present the data from a crowdsourced project seeking to replicate findings in independent laboratories before (rather than after) they are published. In this Pre-Publication Independent Replication (PPIR) initiative, 25 research groups attempted to replicate 10 moral judgment effects from a single laboratory’s research pipeline of unpublished findings. The 10 effects were investigated using online/lab surveys containing psychological manipulations (vignettes) followed by questionnaires. Results revealed a mix of reliable, unreliable, and culturally moderated findings. Unlike any previous replication project, this dataset includes the data from not only the replications but also from the original studies, creating a unique corpus that researchers can use to better understand reproducibility and irreproducibility in science

Marketing as a Means to Transformative Social Conflict Resolution: Lessons from Transitioning War Economies and the Colombian Coffee Marketing System

A. BARRIOS, K. DE VALCK, C. SCHULTZ, O. SIBAI, K. HUSEMANN, M. MAXWELL-SMITH, M. K. LUEDICKE

Journal of Public Policy & Marketing

automne 2016, vol. 35, n°2, pp.185-197

Départements : Marketing, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Colombia, peace/war economy, social conflict, systemic analysis, transformation

http://journals.ama.org/doi/abs/10.1509/jppm.15.151


Social conflicts are ubiquitous to the human condition and occur throughout markets, marketing processes, and marketing systems. When unchecked or unmitigated, social conflict can have devastating consequences for consumers, marketers, and societies, especially when conflict escalates to war. In this article, the authors offer a systemic analysis of the Colombian war economy, with its conflicted shadow and coping markets, to show how a growing network of fair-trade coffee actors has played a key role in transitioning the country’s war economy into a peace economy. They particularly draw attention to the sources of conflict in this market and highlight four transition mechanisms—i.e., empowerment, communication, community building and regulation—through which marketers can contribute to peacemaking and thus produce mutually beneficial outcomes for consumers and society. The article concludes with a discussion of implications for marketing theory, practice, and public policy


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