Articles

Time Compression (Dis)Economies: An Empirical Analysis

A. HAWK, G. PACHECO DE ALMEIDA

Strategic Management Journal

A paraître

Départements : Stratégie et Politique d’Entreprise, GREGHEC (CNRS)


To investigate time compression diseconomies (TCD), this study estimated time-cost elasticities using 459 oil and gas global investment projects (1997-2010). Results show that the average cost of accelerating investments is negative: a firm could cut $6.3 million in costs of a single project by accumulating asset stocks one month faster. About 88 percent of the projects exhibit negative time-cost elasticities with over 39 percent of unrealized economies of time compression. Only 12 percent of the projects are subject to TCD. These time inefficiencies or frictions do not negate the existence of TCD, but suggest they are less prevalent than assumed in the literature. Management experience, R&D investment, firm size, economic development and political stability are shown to be associated with greater time compression efficiency

Willing and Able: A General Model of Organizational Responses to Normative Pressures

R. DURAND, O. HAWN, I. IOANNOU

Academy of Management Review

A paraître

Départements : Stratégie et Politique d’Entreprise, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : institutional theory, normative pressures, symbolic, substantive, conformity, compliance, issue salience

https://journals.aom.org/doi/abs/10.5465/amr.2016.0107?journalCode=amr


We develop a conceptual understanding of when and how organizations respond to normative pressures. More precisely, we examine two main factors underlying the willingness and ability of organizations to respond to an issue: (1) issue salience, and (2) the cost-benefit analysis of resource mobilization. We suggest that decision-makers’ interpretation of issue salience in conjunction with their perception of the costs and benefits of taking action to address the issue generates five potential responses: symbolic compliance and symbolic conformity, substantive compliance and substantive conformity, and inaction. We extend the baseline model by examining a number of boundary conditions. By focusing on the willingness and ability of organizations to respond to normative pressures, and by adopting the issue as the unit of analysis, our model helps explain intra- as well as inter-organizational response heterogeneity to institutional complexity. We contribute to the institutional research tradition and offer useful implications for managerial practice, from strategic management to policy making

À la découverte du lien organisationnel : avez-vous lu A. O. Hirschman ?

A. BLOCH, H. DUMEZ, R. DURAND, A-C. MARTINET

Management International

hiver 2018, vol. 22, n°2, pp.9-12

Départements : Stratégie et Politique d’Entreprise, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Théorie des organisations, Hirschman, sortie, voix, loyauté

http://www.managementinternational.ca/catalog/introduction-au-dossier-special-vol-22-n2.html


Le dossier spécial consacré par la revue Management International à la pensée de Albert O. Hirschman est issu d’une journée organisée par i3-CRG, le LIRSA (CNAM) et SnO d’HEC. Il s’agit de revenir sur l’importance des concepts de Hirschman pour la théorie des organisations, notamment exit, voice et loyalty. Économiste de formation, spécialiste notamment de l’économie du développement, Hirschman a pratiqué toute sa vie durant le dépassement des frontières disciplinaires (trespassing) ce qui l’a amené à la théorie des organisations et il reste un exemple pour les chercheurs actuels

A Universe of Stories: Mobilizing Narrative Practices During Transformative Change

E. DALPIAZ, G. DI STEFANO

Strategic Management Journal

mars 2018, vol. 39, n°3, pp.664-696

Départements : Stratégie et Politique d’Entreprise, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : strategic change, narrative, strategyaspractice, storytelling, reflection

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/smj.2730


Constructing narratives of transformative change is an important but challenging practice through which strategy makers attempt to influence acceptance of an ongoing transformation. To understand whether and how strategy makers can construct a steady influx of captivating narratives of transformative change, we analyzed how one noted strategy maker assisted the successful transformation of his organization over three decades by orchestrating the production of change narratives. Our analysis reveals that the strategy maker constructed and reconstructed meanings of change over time using three sets of distinct but interconnected narrative practices. We develop a dynamic model linking the simultaneous mobilization of these practices to strategy makers’ ability to harness the persistent tension between novelty and familiarity in a transformative change, and thereby win endorsement from key audiences. This paper was accepted for publication on Strategic Management Journal Special Issue on "Strategy Processes and Practices: Dialogues and Intersections"

Differential Firm Commitment to Industries Supported by Social Movement Organizations

R. DURAND, P. GEORGALLIS

Organization Science

janvier-février 2018, vol. 29, n°1, pp.154-171

Départements : Stratégie et Politique d’Entreprise, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : organization and management theory, strategy and policy, sustainability/corporate environmentalism, economic sociology, nonmarket/political environment

https://pubsonline.informs.org/doi/abs/10.1287/orsc.2017.1170


This article theorizes about and tests the conditions under which firms’ commitment to an industry is influenced by social movement organizations (SMOs) that favor the industry. We argue that the more prominent SMOs are within an industry, the more a firm increases its commitment to that industry by expanding its operations; yet, this main effect should be moderated substantially by a firm’s idiosyncratic characteristics. The current research predicts that a firm’s location, its sensitivity to information about the industry’s potential, and its history of associations with activists determine the magnitude of the effect of SMO prominence on its strategic commitment to the industry. We test and find support for these hypotheses using a longitudinal data set of European manufacturers of solar photovoltaic cells between 1990 and 2011. The findings offer new insights for literature on social movements and organizations, as well as strategic management research

Achieving High Growth in Policy-Dependent Industries: Differences between Startups and Corporate-Backed Ventures

R. DURAND, G. PANAYIOTIS (PANIKOS)

Long Range Planning

aout 2017, vol. 50, n°4, pp.487-500

Départements : Stratégie et Politique d’Entreprise, GREGHEC (CNRS)

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S002463011630053X


This research examines which firms achieve high growth in policy-dependent industries. Using the European solar photovoltaic industry as our empirical setting, we investigate the impact of policy support on the growth of independent startups and corporate-backed ventures operating across countries with diverse policy conditions. We find that producers' growth is positively linked to policy generosity, and negatively linked to policy discontinuity. Moreover, corporate-backed ventures are less affected by policy generosity compared to entrepreneurial startups, and less impacted by policy discontinuity as well. Our results underline the importance of country- and firm-level differences in analyzing firms' response to regulatory policies, and point to the need for a better understanding of the unintended consequences of policies designed to support new industries.

Alleviating Managerial Dilemmas In Human-Capital-Intensive Firms Through Incentives: Evidence From M&A Legal Advisors

O. CHATAIN, P. MEYER-DOYLE

Strategic Management Journal

février 2017, vol. 38, pp.232-254

Départements : Stratégie et Politique d’Entreprise, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Human-Capital-Intensive Firms, Human Capital, Managerial Dilemmas, Incentives, Capabilities, Micro-foundations, Mergers and Acquisitions, Law firms

http://ssrn.com/abstract=2693097


We examine how human-capital-intensive firms deploy their human assets and how firm-specific human capital interacts with incentives to influence this deployment. Our empirical context is the UK M&A legal market, where micro-data enable us to observe the allocation of lawyers to M&A mandates under different incentive regimes. We find that law firms actively equalize the workload among their lawyers to seek efficiency gains while ‘stretching’ lawyers with high firm-specific capital to a greater extent. However, lawyers with high firm-specific capital also appear to influence the staffing process in their favor, leading to unbalanced allocations and less sharing of projects and clients. Paradoxically, law firms may adopt a seniority-based rent-sharing system that weakens individual incentives to mitigate the impact of incentive conflicts on resource deployment

Behavioral Strategy and the Strategic Decision Architecture of the Firm

O. SIBONY, D. LOVALLO, T. C. POWELL

California Management Review

2017, vol. 59, n°3, pp.5-21

Départements : Stratégie et Politique d’Entreprise

Mots clés : behavioral strategy, psychology, cognitive bias, strategic decision process


This special issue explores the impacts of behavioral strategy on managementpractice. Behavioral strategy can best contribute to management practice by shifting its focus from individual decision biases to the design of behaviorally informed decision processes at the level of the firm. This introduction identifies three types of organizational decision processes, shows how they interact with individual and group biases, and proposes a model showing how managers can design and deploy these processes to shape the strategy of the firm. It then introduces the articles in this special issue and discusses their contributions to the future of behavioral strategy

Better Safe than Sorry: Subsidiary Performance Feedback and Internal Governance in Multiunit Firms

M. SENGUL, T. OBLOJ

Journal of Management

novembre 2017, vol. 43, n°8, pp.2526-2554

Départements : Stratégie et Politique d’Entreprise, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Dirigé par: Special Issue: Resource Allocation and Strategy

Mots clés : autonomy, governance, incentives, organization design, performance feedback, resource allocation, structural adaptation


This paper explores the link between subsidiary performance feedback and internal governance mechanisms in multiunit firms. A central premise of performance feedback models is that performance below aspirations is associated with increased risk tolerance and thereby with a higher likelihood of taking excessive risks in resource allocation decisions. Building on this observation, we contend that the headquarters of multiunit firms take this association into account in the design of internal (i.e., headquarters-subsidiary) governance mechanisms. Accordingly, a subsidiary’s performance-aspiration gap (below aspirations) is positively associated with the headquarters’ oversight of its resource allocation decisions and negatively associated with the provision of incentive schemes that promote risk taking. Regression results, using data on subsidiaries in France between 1998 and 2004, support our hypotheses and show that subsidiaries performing below historical and social aspirations are less likely to be given discretion in investment decisions and incentivized by cash bonuses. In the supplementary analyses we also provide suggestive evidence that subsidiary performance problems in multiunit firms trigger structural adaptation in the internal governance mechanisms in pursuit of regaining fit

Estimating Value Creation from Revealed Preferences: Application to Value-Based Strategies

O. CHATAIN, D. MINDRUTA

Strategic Management Journal

octobre 2017, vol. 38, pp.1964-1985

Départements : Stratégie et Politique d’Entreprise, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : buyer–supplier relationships; client-speciceconomies of scope; cooperative game theory; revealedpreferences; value-based strategy

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/smj.2633/epdf


We develop and apply a new set of empirical tools consistent with the tenets of value-based business strategies, leveraging the principle that “no good deal comes undone” and the methods of revealed preferences to empirically estimate drivers of value creation. We demonstrate how to use these tools in an analysis of value creation in buyer–supplier relationships in the UK corporate legal market. We show how the method can uncover evidence of subtle mechanisms that traditional methods cannot easily distinguish from each other. Furthermore, we show how these estimates can be used as parameters of biform games for out-of-sample analyses of strategic decisions. With readily available data on relationships between firms, this approach can be applied to many other contexts of interest to strategy researchers


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