Articles

Disciplinary practices in the French auditing profession

C. LESAGE, G. HOTTEGINDRE, C. R. BAKER

Accounting, Auditing and Accountability Journal

2016, vol. 29, n°1, pp.11-42

Départements : Comptabilité et Contrôle de Gestion, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Content analysis, Audit quality, Auditing, Disciplinary practices, Public accounting profession, Public interest

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/full/10.1108/AAAJ-12-2012-1169


Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to contribute to understand the role of the statutory auditing profession in France. The study is theoretically based on distinctions between a functionalist view of professions and a neo-weberian view. Prior research, conducted in Anglo-American countries has shown that the auditing profession has focussed primarily on protecting the private interests of the profession. Hence, there is a need to conduct research on this topic in a code law country where the state is expected to play a significant role in protecting the public interest.Design/methodology/approach – The methodology involves a content analysis of 148 disciplinary decisions issued against statutory auditors in France from 1989 to 2006. This analysis identified 21 types of violations grouped into public interest or private interest offences. Because visible offences are public and are more likely to threaten the reputation of the profession, these types of decisions are also studied with respect to their visibility.Findings – The results reveal that in a code law country such as France the auditing profession tends to defend both the public interest as well as its private interests. The results also support the “visibility” effect.Research limitations/implications – The written disciplinary decisions have been anonymized so that the names of the auditors and the clients cannot be identified.Originality/value – This paper differs from previous studies conducted in the Anglo-American context which show an emphasis on protecting the private interests of the auditing profession. Moreover, this study reveals the existence of “mixed” offences and underlines that a profession primarily focusses on these cases. Thus, the work reconciles in part the functionalist and neo-weberian perspectives. Lastly, this paper confirms the importance of the visibility effect

Do Ratings of Firms Converge? Implications for Managers, Investors and Strategy Researchers

A. CHATTERJI, R. DURAND, D. LEVINE, S. TOUBOUL

Strategic Management Journal

aout 2016, vol. 37, n°8, pp.1597–1614

Départements : Stratégie et Politique d’Entreprise, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Corporate social responsibility, Ratings, Corporate governance, Socially responsible investing, Performance measurement

http://ssrn.com/abstract=2524861


Raters of firms play an important role in assessing domains ranging from sustainability to corporate governance to best places to work. Managers, investors, and scholars increasingly rely on these ratings to make strategic decisions, invest trillions of dollars in capital and study corporate social responsibility (CSR), guided by the implicit assumption that the ratings are valid. We document the surprising lack of agreement across social ratings from six well-established raters. These differences remain even when we adjust for explicit differences in the definition of CSR held by different raters, implying the ratings have low validity. Our results suggest that users of social ratings should exercise caution in interpreting their connection to actual CSR and that raters should conduct regular evaluations of their ratings

Does Ownership Matter in Private Equity? The sources of Variance in Buyouts' Performance

F. CASTELLANETA, O. GOTTSCHALG

Strategic Management Journal

février 2016, vol. 37, n°2, pp.330-348

Départements : Stratégie et Politique d’Entreprise, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Corporate effects, Private equity, Variance decomposition, Multilevel analysis, Firm performance

http://ssrn.com/abstract=2507665


We study the impact of ownership on firm performance in an unexplored governance context: private equity (PE) firms and the buyouts in which they invest. We employ a multiple-membership, cross-classified, multilevel model on a unique database of 6,950 buyouts realized by 255 PE firms between 1973 and 2008 in 77 countries. The results document a significant PE firm effect (4.6%), the importance of which grows as time passes. We then study three contingencies that increase the importance of the PE firm effect: (a) value addition vs. selection strategies; (b) developed vs. emerging economies; and (c) economic downturns. Our findings shed new light on the sources of variance in buyouts’ performance

Employee Mobility and Organizational Outcomes: An Integrative Conceptual Framework and Research Agenda

J. K. MAWDSLEY, D. SOMAYA

Journal of Management

janvier 2016, vol. 42, n°1, pp.85-113

Départements : Stratégie et Politique d’Entreprise, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Employee mobility, Human capital, Relational capital, Organizational outcomes


A large and growing literature spanning multiple fields has identified employee mobility as a critical influence on several important organizational outcomes. However, extant research on the topic is highly fragmented and lacks a unifying theoretical framework, impeding the development of a cumulative conceptually-integrated body of research. We seek to remedy this situation by undertaking a review of research on employee mobility and its organizational impacts, and casting it within a novel integrative conceptual framework. As a critical foundation for this framework, we highlight how the various organizational impacts of employee mobility are ultimately engendered by different dimensions of human and/or relational capital that are conveyed by mobile individuals. Building on this foundation, we describe how multi-level contextual factors – characterized as attributes of the employee, source and destination firms, and environmental conditions – may moderate the transfer and utilization of human and relational capital held by mobile individuals. Finally, we review how constraining factors, such as labor market imperfections on both demand and supply sides, can impede employee mobility, and also how alternative competing channels – for example, alliances, networks and geographic spillovers, and acquisitions – may be used for effectuating the same organizational impacts as mobility events. These constraints and competing channels are important because they circumscribe the conditions under which employee mobility can be a critical influence on organizational outcomes. We seek to provide a rich integrative theoretical understanding of employee mobility, and spur future research on important unanswered research questions

Entrepreneuriat et société : de nouveaux enjeux

A. BLOCH, Nazik FADIL, Olivier GERMAIN, Frank JANSSEN

Management International

hiver 2016, vol. 20, n°2, pp.12-17

http://www.managementinternational.ca/catalog/introduction-au-dossier-thematique-entrepreneuriat-et-societe-de-nouveaux-enjeux.html


Introduction au dossier thématique : Entrepreneuriat et société : de nouveaux enjeux

Equity crowdfunding: A new phenomena

N. VULKAN, T. ASTEBRO, M. FERNANDEZ SIERRA

Journal of Business Venturing Insights

juin 2016, vol. 5, pp.37–49

Départements : Stratégie et Politique d’Entreprise, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Equity crowdfunding, UK, Campaign success

http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2700236


Crowdfunding has recently become available for entrepreneurs. Most academic studies analyse data from rewards-based (pre-selling) campaigns. In contrast, in this paper we analyse 636 campaigns, encompassing 17,188 investors and 64,831 investments between 2012 and 2015, from one of the leading European equity crowdfunding platforms. We provide descriptive statistics and carry out cross-campaign regression analysis. The descriptive statistics address its size, growth and geographic distributions in the UK. The regressions analyse which factors are associated with the probability of a successful campaign. We find some similarities and some interesting dissimilarities when comparing the descriptive statistics and regression results to research on rewards-based crowding. The data show that equity crowdfunding will likely pose great challenges to VC and business angel financiers in the near future. We discuss some research challenges and opportunities with these kind of data

Fed Funds Futures Variance Futures

D. FILIPOVIC, A. TROLLE

Quantitative Finance

2016, vol. 16, n°9, pp.1413-1422

Départements : Finance

Mots clés : fed funds futures, Funding costs, Unsecured interbank money market

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/14697688.2016.1152391


We develop a novel contract design, the fed funds futures (FFF) variance futures, which reflects the expected realized basis point variance of an underlying FFF rate. The valuation of short-term FFF variance futures is completely model-independent in a general setting that includes the cases where the underlying FFF rate exhibits jumps and where the realized variance is computed by sampling the FFF rate discretely. The valuation of longer-term FFF variance futures is subject to an approximation error which we quantify and show is negligible. We also provide an illustrative example of the practical valuation and use of the FFF variance futures contract

Financial Distress Risk and New CEO Compensation

W.-J. CHANG, R. M. HAYES, S. HILLEGEIST

Management Science

février 2016, vol. 62, n°2, pp. 479 - 501

Départements : Comptabilité et Contrôle de Gestion, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : CEO compensation, Compensation premium, CEO incentives, Financial distress risk


We examine how ex ante financial distress risk affects CEO compensation. To disentangle the joint effects of performance on compensation and distress risk, we focus our analyses on new CEOs. Our results indicate that financial distress risk affects compensation through two channels. First, new CEOs receive significantly more compensation when financial distress risk is higher. This finding is consistent with CEOs receiving a compensation premium for bearing this risk since CEOs experience large personal costs if their firms later become financially distressed. Second, financial distress risk is associated with the incentives provided to new CEOs; distress risk is positively associated with pay-performance sensitivity and equity-based compensation and is negatively associated with cash bonuses. Further, financial distress risk is positively associated with pay-risk sensitivity for new CEOs. These findings suggest that financial distress risk alters the nature of the agency relationship in ways that lead firms to provide CEOs with more equity-based incentives. We also build on research that finds a positive relation between forced turnover risk and CEO compensation. Our analyses suggest the compensation effects of forced turnover risk appear to be mainly attributable to financial distress risk. Overall, our results indicate financial distress risk is an economically important determinant of new CEO compensation packages

For a dollar, would you...? How (we think) money affects compliance with our requests

V. K. BOHNS, D. NEWARK, A. Z. XU

Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes

mai 2016, vol. 134, pp.45-62

Départements : Management et Ressources Humaines

Mots clés : Compliance; Money; Morality; Prosocial behavior; Social influence; Social prediction

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0749597816302102


Research has shown a robust tendency for people to underestimate their ability to get others to comply with their requests. In five studies, we demonstrate that this underestimation-of-compliance effect is reduced when requesters offer money in exchange for compliance. In Studies 1 and 2, participants assigned to a no-incentive or monetary-incentive condition made actual requests of others. In both studies, requesters who offered no incentives underestimated the likelihood that those they approached would grant their requests; however, when requesters offered monetary incentives, this prediction error was mitigated. In Studies 3–5, we present evidence in support of a model to explain the underlying mechanism for this attenuation effect. Studies 3 and 4 demonstrate that offering monetary incentives activates a money-market frame. In Study 5, we find that this activation reduces the discomfort associated with asking, allowing requesters to more accurately assess the size of their request and, consequently, the likelihood of compliance

Hierarchies and entrepreneurship

J. TAG, T. ASTEBRO, P. THOMPSON

European Economic Review

octobre 2016, vol. 89, pp.129–147

Départements : Stratégie et Politique d’Entreprise, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Entrepreneurship, Employee mobility, Hierarchy, Rank; Small firm effect

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0014292116301179


We establish a correlation between the hierarchical structure of a firm and the likelihood of business creation among its former employees, using a sample of 16 million observations of Swedish workers and a novel proxy for hierarchies based on occupation data. Conditional on firm size and many other variables, employees in firms with more layers are less likely to enter entrepreneurship, to become self-employed, and to switch to another employer. The effects of layers are much stronger for business creation than for job-switching and they are stronger for entrepreneurship than for self-employment. We discuss two potential explanations for the distinctive hierarchy effect we find. Part of the effect could be to be due to preference sorting by employees, and part due to employees in firms with fewer layers having a broader range of skills. One test showing that the probability of entrepreneurship increases with their prior rank in an organization is consistent with ability sorting and inconsistent with preference sorting


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