Articles

Linear-Rational Term Structure Models

D. FILIPOVIC, M. LARSSON, A. TROLLE

The Journal of Finance

avril 2017, vol. 72, n°2, pp.655-704

Départements : Finance


We introduce the class of linear-rational term structure models in which the state price density is modeled such that bond prices become linear-rational functions of the factors. This class is highly tractable with several distinct advantages: (i) ensures nonnegative interest rates, (ii) easily accommodates unspanned factors affecting volatility and risk premiums, and (iii) admits semi-analytical solutions to swaptions. A parsimonious model specification within the linear-rational class has a very good fit to both interest rate swaps and swaptions since 1997 and captures many features of term structure, volatility, and risk premium dynamics—including when interest rates are close to the zero lower bound

Media bias and the persistence of the expectation gap: An analysis of press articles on corporate fraud

J. COHEN, Y. DING, C. LESAGE, H. STOLOWY

Journal of Business Ethics

2017, vol. 144, n°3, pp.637-659

Départements : Comptabilité et Contrôle de Gestion, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Expectation gap, Media bias, Corporate fraud, Management behavior, Press, Fraud-related professional standards

http://ssrn.com/abstract=2655770


Prior research has documented the continued existence of an expectation gap, defined as the divergence between the public’s and the profession’s conceptions of auditor’s duties, despite the auditing profession’s attempt to adopt standards and practices to close this gap. In this paper, we consider one potential explanation for the persistence of the expectation gap: the role of media bias in shaping public opinion and views. We analyze press articles covering 40 U.S. corporate fraud cases discovered between 1992 and 2011. We compare the auditor’s duties, described by the auditing standards, with the description of the fraud cases as found in the press articles. We draw upon prior research to identify three sources of the expectation gap: deficient performance, deficient standards, and unreasonable expectations. The results of our analysis provide evidence that (1) the performance gap can be reduced by strengthening auditor’s willingness and ability to apply existing auditing standards concerning fraud detection; (2) the standards gap can be narrowed by improving existing auditing standards; and (3) unreasonable expectations, however, involve elements beyond the profession’s sphere of control. As a result, the expectation gap is unlikely to disappear given the media’s tendency to bias, with an overemphasis of unreasonable expectations in their coverage of frauds and press articles tending to reinforce the view that the auditor should take more responsibility for detecting fraud, irrespective of whether this is feasible at a reasonable cost. In addition to the primary role of the press in perpetuating the expectation gap, a second reason for continuation of the expectation gap is that the rational auditor will have difficulty in assessing subjective components of fraudulent behavior.

Optimizing Multi-Team System Behaviours: Insights from Modelling Team Communication

D. KENNEDY, A. SOMMER, P. NGUYEN

European Journal of Operational Research

avril 2017, vol. 258, n°1, pp.264–278

Départements : Management et Ressources Humaines

Mots clés : Behavioural operations, Project management, Multi-team systems, Mixed integer linear optimization

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0377221716306750


To better manage behavioural operations in project management, we demonstrate the value of quantitative model-based approaches in examining behaviours and generating insights for managerial research and practice. We focus on organizational members’ behaviours and interactions on large-scale projects using multi-team systems (MTS). While MTS invoke different behaviours than simpler team systems, research insights have lagged on MTS due to the complexity and resource intensity of capturing the multitude of behaviours and interactions by human subjects in real-world situations. Thus, MTS provides an apt context to demonstrate the mechanics of mathematically modelling human behaviour and conducting virtual experiments via mixed-integer linear optimization to understand the way to meet operational objectives. Virtual experimentation is used to explore communication behaviours that unfold under different levels of project complexity and interdependence when time, cost, and quality operational objectives are considered independently or collectively. The results suggest that the type of communication plan set by project managers needs to change according to project attributes and objectives (maximize quality, minimize cost or minimize time). Moreover, this paper demonstrates the benefits of using operations research methods to assess behavioural patterns in an operational setting and establish propositions for targeted research in the field. In conclusion, benefits and limitations are put forth about the way Behavioural OR expands the traditional toolkit of human subject researchers in operations and beyond.

Pricing and Capacity Allocation for Shared Services

V. KOSTAMI, D. KOSTAMIS, S. ZIYA

Manufacturing & Service Operations Management

printemps 2017, vol. 19, n°2, pp.230-245

Départements : Informations Systems and Operations Management

Mots clés : customer mix; customer interaction; price discrimination; capacity allocation; shared services

http://pubsonline.informs.org/doi/abs/10.1287/msom.2016.0606


We study the pricing and capacity allocation problem of a service provider who serves two distinct customer classes. Customers in each class are inherently heterogeneous in their willingness to pay for service, but their utilities are also affected by the presence of other customers in the system. Specifically, customer utilities depend on how many customers are in the system at the time of service as well as who these other customers are. We find that if the service provider can price discriminate between customer classes, pricing out a class, i.e., operating an exclusive system, can sometimes be optimal and depends only on classes’ perceptions of each other. If the provider must charge a single price, an exclusive system is even more likely. We extend our analysis to a service provider who can prevent class interaction by allocating separate capacity segments to the two customer classes. Under price discrimination, allocating capacity is optimal if the “net appreciation” between classes, as defined in the paper, is negative. However, under a single-price policy, allocating capacity can be optimal even if this net appreciation is positive. We describe in detail how the nature of asymmetry in classes’ perception of each other determines the optimal strategy

Public-Private Collaboration, Hybridity and Social Value: Towards New Theoretical Perspectives

B. QUELIN, I. KIVLENIECE, S. LAZZARINI

Journal of Management Studies

septembre 2017, vol. 54, n°6, pp.763-792

Départements : Stratégie et Politique d’Entreprise, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : cross-sector collaboration, hybrid arrangements, interorganizational governance,organizational design, public-private partnerships, social value


Focusing on the collaboration intersecting public, non-profit and private spheres ofeconomic activity, we analyse the conceptual forms of hybridity embedded in these novel inter-organizational arrangements, and link them to different mechanisms of creating social value. Wefirst disentangle alternative notions of hybrid arrangements in existing literature by proposing aconceptual typology on two theoretically complementary yet distinct dimensions: hybridity ingovernance and hybridity in organizational logics. We show how both forms of hybridity canjointly occur in complex public-private and cross-sector collaborations, and propose the notion ofvalue as a crucial bridging point between these perspectives. Crucially, we develop a conceptualframework on key theoretical mechanisms leading to economic and social value in these inter-organizational collaborations. Our work deepens the understanding of how diverse, hybrid formsof collaboration can create value and builds critical links between previously disparate streams ofliterature on public-private interaction, cross-sect or collaboration and social enterprises

Strategic Investment in Renewable Energy Sources: The Effect of Supply Intermittency

S. AFLAKI, S. NETESSINE

Manufacturing & Service Operations Management

Summer 2017, vol. 19, n°3, pp.489-507

Départements : Informations Systems and Operations Management, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Electricity Generation, Renewables, Intermittency, Capacity Planning and Investment, Incentives and Contracting

https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2661582


To analyze incentives for investing in the capacity to generate renewable electricity, we model the trade-off between renewable (e.g. wind) and nonrenewable (e.g. natural gas) technology. Renewable technology has a higher investment cost and yields only an intermittent supply of electricity; nonrenewable technology is reliable and has lower investment cost but entails both fuel expenditures and carbon emission costs. With reference to existing electricity markets, we model several interrelated contexts - the vertically integrated electricity supplier, market competition, and partial market competition with long-term fixed-price contracts for renewable electricity - and examine the effect of carbon taxes on the cost and share of wind capacity in an energy portfolio. We find that the intermittency of renewable technologies drives the effectiveness of carbon pricing mechanisms, which suggests that charging more for emissions could unexpectedly discourage investment in renewables. We also show that market liberalization may reduce investment in renewable capacity while increasing the overall system's cost and emissions. Fixed-price contracts with renewable generators can mitigate these detrimental effects, but not without possibly creating other problems. In short: actions to reduce the intermittency of renewable sources may be more effective than carbon taxes alone at promoting investment in renewable generation capacity

Systemic Risk in Clearing Houses: Evidence from the European Repo Market

C. BOISSEL, F. DERRIEN, E. ORS, D. THESMAR

Journal of Financial Economics

septembre 2017, vol. 125, n°3, pp.511-536

Départements : Finance, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : repurchase agreement; sovereign debt crisis; LTRO; secured money market lending; clearing houses

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304405X17301277


We study how crises affect Central Clearing Counterparties (CCPs). We focus on a large and safe segment of CCP-cleared repo market during the Eurozone sovereign debt crisis. We develop a simple model to infer CCP stress, which is measured as repo rates’ sensitivity to sovereign CDS spreads and jointly captures (1) the effectiveness of haircut policies, (2) CCP-member default risk (conditional on sovereign default), and (3) CCP default risk (conditional on both sovereign and CCP-member default). During 2011, repo rates strongly respond to sovereign risk, particularly for GIIPS countries: repo investors behaved as if the conditional probability of CCP default was substantial. (100 words)

The Effect of Business and Financial Market Cycles on Credit Ratings: Evidence from the Last Two Decades

G. LOBO, L. PAUGAM, H. STOLOWY, P. ASTOLFI

Abacus

2017, vol. 53, n°1, pp.59-93

Départements : Comptabilité et Contrôle de Gestion, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Business cycles; Credit rating agencies; Financial marketcycles; Investor reaction


We analyze the effect of business and financial market cycles on creditratings using a sample of firms from the Russell 3000 index that are ratedby Standard and Poor’s over the period 1986–2012. We also examine inves-tor reaction to credit rating actions in different stages of business andfinancial market cycles. We document that credit rating agencies areinfluenced by business and financial market cycles; they assign lower creditratings during downturns of business and financial market cycles andhigher ratings during upturns. Our study is the first to find strong evidenceof pro-cyclicality in credit ratings using a long window. We also documentstronger investor reaction to negative credit rating actions during down-turns. Our results confirm theoretical predictions and inform regulators

The Effect of Joint Auditor Pair Composition on Audit Quality: Evidence from Impairment Tests

G. LOBO, L. PAUGAM, D. ZHANG, J.-F. CASTA

Contemporary Accounting Research

Spring 2017, vol. 34, n°1, pp.118-153

Départements : Comptabilité et Contrôle de Gestion, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Joint Audits, Audit Quality, Auditor Independence, Impairment Testing, Conservatism


The expanding domain of strategic management research and the quest for integration

R. DURAND, R. M. GRANT, T. L. MADSEN

Strategic Management Journal

janvier 2017, vol. 38, n°1, pp.4-16

Départements : Stratégie et Politique d’Entreprise, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : literature reviews; paradigm; scholarly field; fragmentation, integration


This special issue of Strategic Management Journal was motivated by concern that the growing scope and diversity of the strategic management field creates the risk of incoherence and fragmentation and the belief that research reviews could contribute to synthesis and integration. In this introductory essay, we address the expanding domain of strategic management, consider where its boundaries lie, identify the forces engendering fragmentation, and discuss how this special issue—and research reviews in general—can assist convergence within the field of strategy. We conclude by addressing the potential for integration more broadly in relation to the theories we deploy, the phenomena we investigate, and cohesiveness of our scholarly community


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