Articles

Introduction to Global Law, Legal Indicators and Legal Pragmatism

D. RESTREPO AMARILES

Journal of Legal Pluralism and Unofficial Law

A paraître

Départements : Droit et fiscalité


Inventory allocation models for a two-stage, twoproduct, capacitated supplier and retailer problem with random demand

K. LUO, R. BOLLAPRAGADA, L. KERBACHE

International Journal of Production Economics

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Départements : Information Systems and Operations Management, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : supply chain management, inventory management, capacity allocation, heuristic methods

http://ac.els-cdn.com/S0925527316303930/1-s2.0-S0925527316303930-main.pdf?_tid=e3dcdf78-c36d-11e6-ab1d-00000aacb362&acdnat=1481878922_0f8e1cce572aa5799576c97c7d14f216


The objective of this research is to develop an optimal inventory allocation methodology for a supply chain consisting of a capacitated retailer with limited shelf space, and two unreliable capacitated suppliers in an uncertain environment. We develop conceptual and analytical models that provide allocation preferences between shelf-space and warehouse in both deterministic and stochastic demand cases, and develop managerial insights based on them. For each case, we provide both a closed-form solution and a heuristic method, and illustrate the bounds on the optimal solution. Further, we show that the cost function is L-convex in some cases. Finally, we prove that the expected profit decreases as the variance of demand increases

Leadership and the Logic of Absurdity

D. NEWARK

Academy of Management Review

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Départements : Management et Ressources Humaines

http://amr.aom.org/content/early/2017/02/02/amr.2015.0186.abstract


Leaders are often thought to be instrumental to the performance of the organizations they lead. However, considerable research suggests that their influence over organizational performance might actually be minimal. These claims of leader irrelevance pose a puzzle: If leaders are relatively insignificant, why would someone commit to leading? Applying decision-making theory, this paper first considers justifying the decision to lead according to the Logics of Consequence and Appropriateness—the two principal decision-making logics underlying previous work on the motivation to lead. The paper then presents the Logic of Absurdity, a decision-making logic in which decision-makers knowingly choose to dedicate themselves to an irrational course of action. In terms of the decision to lead, a decision-maker employing the Logic of Absurdity acknowledges the likely futility of leading but decides to commit to leading, nonetheless. The paper concludes by considering when leaders are most likely to decide to lead according to the Logic of Absurdity and why doing so may result in leadership of exceptional originality, foolishness, intelligence, and madness

Legal Indicators in Transnational Law Practice: A Methodological Assessment

D. RESTREPO AMARILES

Jurimetrics, The Journal of Law, Science, and Technology

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Départements : Droit et fiscalité


Leveraging strengths to learn, grow, and change: An evidence-based approach to development

S. FOSTER, R. WHITE, L. CLARK, G. DAI, P. LLOYED

Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice & Research

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Life-Cycle Asset Allocation with Ambiguity Aversion and Learning

K. PEIJNENBURG

Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis

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Départements : Finance, GREGHEC (CNRS)


Making a Niche: The Marketization of Management Research and the Rise of “Knowledge Branding”

A. MEHRPOUYA, H. WILLMOTT

Journal of Management Studies

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Départements : Comptabilité et Contrôle de Gestion, GREGHEC (CNRS)


Marking to Market and Inefficient Investment Decisions

C. OTTO, P. F. VOLPIN

Management Science

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Départements : Finance, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Marking to Market, Investment Decisions, Reputation, Agency Problem


We examine how mark-to-market accounting affects the investment decisions of managers with reputation concerns. Reporting the current market value of a firm's assets can help mitigate agency problems because it provides outsiders (e.g., shareholders) with new information against which the management's decisions can be evaluated. However, the fact that the assets' market value is informative can also have a negative side effect: Managers may shy away from investments that indicate conflicting private information and would damage their reputation. This effect can lead to inefficient investment decisions and make marking to market less desirable when market prices are more informative

Non-additivity in accounting valuation: Theory and applications

L. PAUGAM, Jean-François CASTA, H. STOLOWY

Abacus

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Départements : Comptabilité et Contrôle de Gestion, GREGHEC (CNRS)


Optimizing Service Failure and Damage Control

D. HALBHEER, D. L. GÄRTNER, E. GERSTNER, O. KOENIGSBERG

International Journal of Research in Marketing

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Départements : Marketing, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Service Quality, Service Reliability, Service Failure, Damage Control

https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2704861


Should a provider deliver a reliable service or should it allow for occasional service failures? This paper derives conditions under which randomizing service quality can benefit the provider and society. In addition to cost considerations, heterogeneity in customer damages from service failures allows the provider to generate profit from selling damage prevention services or offering compensation to high-damage customers. This strategy is viable even when reputation counts and markets are competitive


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