Articles

L'économie allemande en 2003

H. BRODERSEN

Allemagne d'Aujourd'hui

avril-juin 2003, n°164, pp.93-98

Départements : Langues et Cultures


Economie et fiscalité. Bilan du social-libéralisme allemand

H. BRODERSEN

Allemagne d'Aujourd'hui

juillet-septembre 2002, n°161, pp.15-37

Départements : Langues et Cultures


La réforme des retraites

H. BRODERSEN

Allemagne d'Aujourd'hui

juillet-septembre 2002, n°161, pp.59-72

Départements : Langues et Cultures


From "Outside" the World to "Inside" and Back: Ursula K. Le Guin's (Re)Construction of a Primal Utopia in Always Coming Home

C. L. ROBINSON

Confluences

2001, vol. 19, pp.161-172

Départements : Langues et Cultures


L'Ours d'Or de Berlin pour "Intimité" de Patrice Chéreau

H. BRODERSEN

Allemagne d'Aujourd'hui

juillet-septembre 2001, n°157, pp.192-195

Départements : Langues et Cultures


L'Allemagne et l'euro. L'euro de l'Allemagne

H. BRODERSEN

Allemagne d'Aujourd'hui

avril-juin 2000, n°152, pp.92-102

Départements : Langues et Cultures


Actes du colloque des 25-27 novembre 1999 organisé par le CRHiCC et le CRAC : "Allemagne 99, perspectives : an 2000"

L'économie sociale de marché : un modèle dépassé ?

H. BRODERSEN

La Revue Internationale et Stratégique

janvier 2000, n°1649, pp.7-14

Départements : Langues et Cultures


reprise de l'article paru en 1999 dans La Revue Internationale et Stratégique

Vznik jazyka - Od gest po syntax

D. SHANAHAN

Vesmir

décembre 2000, n°79, pp.676-677

Départements : Langues et Cultures


In the Silence of the Knight: Kathy Ackers Don Quixote as a Work of Disenchantment

C. L. ROBINSON

Yearbook of Comparative and General Literature

1999, vol. 47, pp.109-231

Départements : Langues et Cultures


Culture, Culture and "Culture" in Foreign Language Teaching

D. SHANAHAN

Foreign Language Annals

octobre 1998, vol. 31, n°3, pp.451-458

Départements : Langues et Cultures


“Culture,” which is taking on increasing importance in contemporary foreign language pedagogy, has also been the subject of much debate. Definitions of what culture is have proliferated, from Matthew Arnold to Levi-Strauss to Edward Hall, and not infrequently lines of opposition have formed around them. But if we abandon an oppositional mode of thinking and address the question of culture and language learning from the perspective of the affective elements contained within both, we may be able to adopt a more ecumenical approach to the former and provide ourselves with a much more powerful tool for helping students acquire the latter


JavaScriptSettings