Articles

The Real Effects of Lending Relationships on Innovative Firms and Inventor Mobility

J. HOMBERT, A. MATRAY

Review of Financial Studies

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Départements : Finance, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Lending relationships, Soft information, Innovation, Inventors

https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2082403


We study whether relationship lending is conducive to the financing of innovation. Exploiting a negative shock to relationships, we show that it reduces the number of innovative firms, especially those that depend more on relationship lending such as small, young, and opaque firms. This credit supply shock leads to reallocation of inventors whereby young and promising inventors leave small firms and move out of geographical areas where lending relationships are hurt. Overall, our results suggest that credit markets affect both the level of innovation activity and the distribution of innovative human capital across the econom

The Relationship between Lack of Controllability and Proactive Work Behaviour: An Empirical Analysis of Competing Theoretical Explanations

M. BURKERT, F. M. FISCHER, F. HOOS, K. SCHUHMACHER

Accounting and Business Research

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Départements : Comptabilité et Contrôle de Gestion, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : controllability principle, management control systems, role theory, role conflict, flexible role orientation, proactive work behaviour

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00014788.2016.1222262


The controllability principle suggests evaluating managers solely based on performance measures they can control. In practice, however, companies often disregard this principle. Therefore, our study addresses organisational benefits linked to the lack of controllability in measures used for managers’ performance evaluations. We draw on important case-based findings to establish a positive ‘base relationship’ between lack of controllability and proactive work behaviour. We test this base relationship with a large-scale sample and find that companies encourage higher levels of proactive work behaviour when they rely on less controllable performance measures. Drawing on recent developments in role theory, we advance previous research and extend the base model by including the theoretical construct of flexible role orientation. We examine different mechanisms through which flexible role orientation potentially impacts the base model. Using survey responses from 432 managers, we find evidence for a mediation model as opposed to an interaction model. Specifically, we find that lack of controllability enhances role conflict, which in turn induces more flexible role orientations ultimately resulting in higher levels of proactive work behaviour

The Role of Cultural Communication Norms in Social Exclusion Effects

J. LEE, L.-J. SHRUM, Y. YI

Journal of Consumer Psychology

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Départements : Marketing, GREGHEC (CNRS)


Too any Cooks Spoil the Broth? Geographic Concentration, Social Norms, and Knowledge Transfer

G. DI STEFANO, A. A. KING, G VERONA

Advances in Strategic Management

A paraître, vol. 36

Départements : Stratégie et Politique d’Entreprise, GREGHEC (CNRS)

https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2767610


A long tradition in social science research emphasizes the potential for knowledge to flow among firms co-located in dense areas. Scholars have suggested numerous modes for these flows, including the voluntary transfer of private knowledge from one firm to another. Why would the holder of valuable private knowledge willingly transfer it to a potential and closely proximate competitor? In this paper, we argue that geographic concentration has an effect on the expected compliance with norms governing the use of transferred knowledge. The increased expected compliance favors trust and initiates a process of reciprocal exchange. To test our theory, we use a scenario-based field experiment in gourmet cuisine, an industry in which property rights do not effectively protect knowledge and geographic concentration is common. Our results confirm our conjecture by showing that the expectation that a potential co-located firm will abide by norms mediates the relationship between geographic concentration and the willingness to transfer private knowledge

Two-sided reputation in certification markets

M. BOUVARD, R. LEVY

Management Science

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Départements : Economie et Sciences de la décision, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Mots clés : Certification, Reputation, Multihoming


In a market where sellers solicit certification to overcome asymmetric information, we show that the profit of a monopolistic certifier can be hump-shaped in its reputation for accuracy: a higher accuracy attracts high-quality sellers but sometimes repels low-quality sellers. As a consequence, reputational concerns may induce the certifier to reduce information quality, thus depressing welfare. The entry of a second certifier impacts reputational incentives: when sellers only solicit one certifier, competition plays a disciplining role and the region where reputation is bad shrinks. Conversely, this region may expand when sellers hold multiple certifications

Uncertainty, Art and Marketing - Searching for the Invisible Hand

R. LAUFER

Philosophy of Management

A paraître, pp.1-24

Départements : Marketing

Mots clés : Institution Art Marketing Legitimacy Pragmatism Uncertainty

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40926-017-0063-0#citeas


The development of art marketing as a new field of management occurs in a context of great confusion as to what constitutes the very definition of art, one aspect of this confusion being nothing else but the confusion between art and marketing itself. This confusion leads to conflicts between those who consider that art should be defined by a clear aesthetic criterion and those who accept the absence of such a criterion as a legitimate consequence of the principle of freedom which applies both to the creation of the artist and to the taste of the public. This state of confusion does not seem to be experienced in the same way in France where it has tended to be considered as a symptom of crisis in the world of art and in the United States where it has raised as a dominant force in contemporary art. Hence the confusion of art and marketing varies as a function of time (as shown by the emergence of a new field of management) and of space (as shown by the comparison of the French and American cases). It will be proposed that it is possible to account for these historical fluctuation thanks to an institutional approach based on the notion of system of legitimacy. We shall propose the essentially dynamic institutional foundations of modernity leading to the proliferation of innovations which consequences are ever more difficult to anticipate as a reason why, in America, philosophers coming from the analytic tradition found it meaningful to address questions such as “What is art” (Arthur Danto) or “When is there art” (Nelson Goodman”) expressing the need to go beyond pragmatism as expressed by John Dewey’s Art as Experience to promote a positive attitude towards contemporary art, while, in France confusion between art and marketing has been commonly considered negatively as the sign of the triumph of the most radical form of rhetoric, i.e. sophism

Vers une révolution entrepreneuriale en France ?

P. ALBERT, E. KRIEGER

Entreprendre & Innover

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Warm-Glow Giving and Freedom to be Selfish

O. EVREN, S. MINARDI

Economic Journal

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Départements : Economie et Sciences de la décision


We look like our names: The manifestation of name stereotypes in facial appearance

Y. ZWEBNER, A.-L. SELLIER, Nir ROSENFELD, Jacob GOLDENBERG, Ruth MAYO

Journal of Personality and Social Psychology

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Départements : Marketing, GREGHEC (CNRS)


Research demonstrates that facial appearance affects social perceptions. The current research investigates the reverse possibility: Can social perceptions influence facial appearance? We examine a social tag that is associated with us early in life—our given name. The hypothesis is that name stereotypes can be manifested in facial appearance, producing a face-name matching effect, whereby both a social perceiver and a computer are able to accurately match a person’s name to his or her face. In eight studies we demonstrate the existence of this effect, as participants examining an unfamiliar face accurately select the person’s true name from a list of several names, significantly above chance level. We replicate the effect in two countries and find that it extends beyond the limits of socioeconomic cues. We also find the effect using a computer-based paradigm and 94,000 faces. In our exploration of the underlying mechanism, we show that existing name stereotypes produce the effect, as its occurrence is culture-dependent and a function of the name prevalence in society. A self-fulfilling prophecy seems to be at work, as initial evidence shows that facial appearance regions that are controlled by the individual (e.g., hairstyle) are sufficient to produce the effect, and socially using one’s given name is necessary to generate the effect. Together, these studies suggest that facial appearance represents social expectations of how a person with a specific name should look. In this way a social tag may influence one’s facial appearance

Who are the value and growth investors?

S. BETERMIER, L. CALVET, P. SODINI

The Journal of Finance

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Départements : Finance

Mots clés : Asset pricing, value premium, household finance, portfolio allocation, human capital, factor-based investing

http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2426823


This paper investigates value and growth investing in a large administrative panel of Swedish residents. We show that over the life-cycle, households progressively shift from growth to value as they become older and their balance sheets improve. Furthermore, investors with high human capital and high exposure to macroeconomic risk tilt their portfolios away from value. While several behavioral biases seem evident in the data, the patterns we uncover are overall remarkably consistent with the portfolio implications of risk-based theories of the value premium


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