Cahiers de recherche

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Départements : Comptabilité et Contrôle de Gestion

his is a study of analysts’ use of accounting information for valuation purposes in a venture capital setting. This setting is characterized in terms of the distinctive scouting and coaching work of venture capital funders, and the unproven and incomplete nature of the ventures and entrepreneurs, which seek funding to scale operations, pivot into new markets, internationalize, or undertake some other kind of fundamental change. Based on interviews with entrepreneurs (project-makers) and venture funders (analysts), a four phase model of valuation is proposed. The model illuminates that, in contrast with common assumptions in the existing literature, accounting is mobilized neither to reveal truth nor constitute knowledge about the objects of investment, but to promise and to care. This paper articulates these two concepts in the context of accounting. Promising is shown to be a means not to implement a predesigned business plan and a budgeted set of activities but to commit to a new and unclear future and agree high and sometimes unrealistic expectations. Caring is shown not to be a means to predict a final fate for the organization, but to give and take, interact and sometimes discipline in order to determine what is necessary to preserve and possible to change. Understanding that what is valued is not what exists but what is possible to create helps to resolve puzzles about accounting’s uncertain and ambiguous status and significance in the entrepreneurial economy. It also and more generally illustrates how accounting operates in relation to an unknowable object and future: not as a means to know or reveal but to write and rewrite a daring and ambitious narrative in which the protagonists (here the project-maker and venture) become something else (a manager and an organization).

Mots clés : Analysts, Valuation, Qualitative Research, Venture Capital


Départements : Finance, GREGHEC (CNRS)

We develop a pricing model to analyze the joint impact of liquidity costs and market segmentation on asset pricing. The freely traded securities command a premium for liquidity level and global market and liquidity risk premiums, whereas securities that can be held by a subset of investors command additionally a local market and liquidity risk premiums. We find that the liquidity level premium dominates the liquidity risk premium for our sample of 24 emerging markets. The global market liquidity risk premium dramatically increases during crises and market corrections. Even though unspanned local risk is significantly priced for most markets, unspanned local liquidity risk premium is empirically small. We develop a new methodology for estimating unspanned local risk. Our results shed light on the channels through which liquidity affects asset prices in partially segmented markets and how this pricing relation changes over time.

Mots clés : International asset pricing, liquidity risk, transaction cost, emerging markets, market integration


Départements : Comptabilité et Contrôle de Gestion, GREGHEC (CNRS)

In this paper, we re-examine the notion that socially-responsible behavior by firms will lead to increased financial performance. By identifying the underlying processes, institutional settings and actors involved, we present a framework that is more attentive to the multiplicity and conditionality of the mechanisms operating in the often-tenuous connection between firms’ social behavior and financial performance. Building and expanding upon existing analyses of the CSP-CFP linkage, our model helps explain the mixed results from a wide range of empirical studies which examine this link. It also provides a novel theoretical account to help guide future research that is more attentive to conditionalities and contextual contingencies.

Mots clés : Business Ethics, Corporate Social Performance, Corporate Financial Performance, Corporate Social Responsibility, Mechanisms


Départements : Stratégie et Politique d’Entreprise, GREGHEC (CNRS)

We advance research on corporate diversification by joining insights from the demand-side and relational views in strategy to offer a novel theory of client-led diversification. We propose that client-led diversification results from a combination of the customer-driven opportunities emphasized in the demand-side view and the creation of added value through relational assets that is a central tenet of the relational view. Furthermore, we hypothesize that suppliers’ client-specific knowledge, clients’ relational commitment to suppliers, and growth opportunities in clients’ markets (relative to the suppliers’ own markets) will magnify the client-led diversification effect. We test our hypotheses using a longitudinal dataset on patent law firms and their diversification into new domains of patent prosecution work for their corporate clients.


Départements : Marketing, GREGHEC (CNRS)

This paper studies the impact of consumer resistance, which is triggered by deviations from a psychological reference point, on optimal pricing and cost communication. Assuming that consumers evaluate purchases not only in the material domain, we show that consumer resistance reduces the pricing power and profit. We also show that consumer resistance provides an incentive to engage in cost communication when consumers underestimate cost. While cheap communication does not affect behavior, persuasive communication may increase sales and profit. Finally, we show that a firm can benefit from engaging in operational transparency by revealing information about features of the production process.

Mots clés : Price Fairness, Cost Communication, Operational Transparency


Départements : Finance, GREGHEC (CNRS)

We estimate international factor models with time-varying factor exposures and risk premia at the individual stock level using a large unbalanced panel of 58,674 stocks in 46 countries over the 1985-2017 period. We consider market, size, value, momentum, profitability, and investment factors aggregated at the country, regional, and world level. The country market in excess of the world or regional market is required in addition to world or regional factors to capture the factor structure for both developed and emerging markets. We do not reject mixed CAPM models with regional and excess country market factors for 76% of the countries. We do not reject mixed multi-factor models in 80% to 94% of countries. Value and momentum premia show more variability over time and across countries than profitability and investment premia. The excess country market premium is statistically significant in many developed and emerging markets but economically larger in emerging markets.

Mots clés : large panel, approximate factor model, risk premium, international asset pricing, market integration


Départements : Stratégie et Politique d’Entreprise, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Organizational adaptation is a concept that describes both congruence within organizations, with respect to the strategies and structures deployed, and across organizations, with respect to the degrees to which organizations meet the expectations of their environments. A wide array of research traditions have explored the concept of adaptation, albeit with many different labels. This annotated bibliography tracks the foundations of organizational adaptation, its digressions, and its challenges. Such a review provides important resources for scholars interested in conducting research in organizational adaptation by identifying the multitude of perspectives that encompass adaptation.

Mots clés : Adaptation, Organizational Change, Strategic Choice


Départements : Economie et Sciences de la décision

This paper analyzes, empirically and theoretically, the link between capital inflows and the quality of economic institutions. Starting with the example of Southern European countries (Spain, Portugal, Italy and Greece), we show that they experienced a significant decline in the quality of their institutions in the run-up to the euro currency, a period of cheap external funding and large capital inflows. We confirm this joint pattern of capital flows and institutional decline in a large panel of countries since the mid-1990s. We then develop an open-economy model of the "soft budget constraint" syndrome wherein persistently cheap funding from abroad (i) raises the prevalence of extractive projects and (ii) expands their support by the (benevolent) government ex post. While the government may in principle limit the prevalence of extractive projects ex ante, we show that the incentives to do so is limited when foreign borrowing is cheap.

Mots clés : Institutions, current account


Départements : Economie et Sciences de la décision, GREGHEC (CNRS)

Relying on a literal interpretation of Weber's law in psychophysics, we show that a simple condition of independence across good categories implies the Cobb-Douglas preferences.

Mots clés : Cobb-Douglas, Weber's Law, Semi-Order


Départements : Economie et Sciences de la décision

This paper shows that bailouts of private agents can optimally take the form of the purchase of a defaulting asset, even if this also means paying off external asset holders. When anticipated, this form of bailouts leads to an endogenous implicit guarantee, where even an intrinsically worthless asset may be traded at a positive price. In the presence of borrowing constraints and imperfectly observable private liquidity needs, direct transfers are imperfect so that, when more constrained agents are also more exposed to a given asset, the compensation through asset purchases becomes optimal. I then show that this possibility of implicit guarantee is amplified by other frictions as risk-shifting and ultimately leads to a coordination problem for selecting stores of liquidity. Finally, I derive policy implications for financial regulation and international capital flows.

Mots clés : Implicit guarantees, bailouts, intrinsically worthless assets


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