Séminaires de Recherche

Customer Retention in a Platform World.

Marketing

Intervenant : Barak LIBAI
Professeur de Marketing , Arison School of Business, Interdisciplinary Center (IDC) – Herzlya, Israel

14 septembre 2017 - Salle T004 - De 10h30 à 12h00


Customer Retention in a Platform World.

By Barak Libai
Arison School of Business, Interdisciplinary Center (IDC) – Herzlya, Israel

In recent year marketer’s attention has been drawn to the prominence of customer retention and the need to low churn, in particular of high value customers. Yet this thinking and analysis has largely focused on the case of a single product, while firms had been advised for a while to manage their offerings as platforms that consist of families of products with a common underlying logic. Taking a platform view, when a new product of the same family enters the market, the users of current products may be good candidates for acquisition efforts to the new offering. This raises interesting questions which widen the existing discussion of customer retention. Which customers would the firm want to transfer from current products and when? Would we want to churn the “best customers” of the current product earlier or later? How would considerations of value that stems from purchases (lifetime value) be different value that stems from the effect on others (social value)? We analyze these questions using agent based models, looking in particular at the market for mobile games, where the question of customer transfer among products is of high importance to firms.

Does the Opinion of the Crowd Predict Success? Evidence from Crowdsourcing

Marketing

Intervenant : Anirban MUKHERJEE
Professeur Assistant de Marketing , Lee Kong Chian School of Business - Singapore Management University

7 juillet 2017 - Salle T015 - De 10h30 à 12h00


Does the Opinion of the Crowd Predict Success? Evidence from Crowdsourcing

By:

Anirban Mukherjee
Assistant Professor of Marketing
Lee Kong Chian School of Business, Singapore Management University

Ping Xiao
Assistant Professor of Marketing, Visiting Assistant Professor of Marketing
Business School of the National University of Singapore, NYU Shanghai

Li Wang
Assistant Professor of Marketing
Shanghai University of Finance and Economics

Noshir Contractor
Jane S. & William J. White Professor of Behavioral Sciences
McCormick School of Engineering & Applied Science, the School of Communication and the
Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University

Abstract

“Crowdsourcing” is the sourcing of organizational functions from the “crowd”: a large, undefined community of a firm’s consumers, partners, and collaborators. A crucial challenge in crowdsourcing is to determine the quality of crowdsourced submissions. To help screen submissions, crowdsourcing portals use crowdvoting: they ask the community to vote on submissions. Our study investigates the informational role of crowdvoting on design submissions on Threadless, a pioneering crowdsourcing website. We collect and examine a novel, large scale dataset tracking over 150,000 designs, submitted by over 45,000 designers, voted on almost 150 million times, by over 600,000 different users. We focus on two questions. First, what is the conventional wisdom—how does crowdvoting influence Threadless? Second, does the conventional wisdom stand up to scrutiny—does crowdvoting systematically predict commercial success? We document several new empirical findings relating crowdvoting to revenues. We conclude by discussing the implications of our research for designers and firms seeking to ride the crowdsourcing tide.

Keywords: crowdsourcing, crowdvoting, new product development, big data.

Technology and Consumer Behavior

Marketing

Intervenant : Jonathan LEVAV
Professeur Associé de Marketing , Stanford Graduate School of Business

12 mai 2017 - Salle T015 - De 10h30 à 12h00


Technology and Consumer Behavior

By Jonathan Levav

Electronic devices are assumed to make markets more efficient and to create a distribution channel for market information. These devices and the applications that run them allow people to engage in commercial transactions on the go, to access information from all parts of the globe, and to communicate through voice and video from anywhere. In the series of papers that make up this talk I will show that people's interactions with these devices can evoke psychological processes that influence the judgments and decisions that people make when using them. Specifically, in multiple field and lab studies I examine how the physical interaction with electronic devices influences psychological processes in systematic ways.

Online Streaming and its Effects on Society

Marketing

Intervenant : Hannes DATTA
Professeur Assistant - Département de Marketing , Tilburg School of Economics and Business

21 avril 2017 - Salle T015 - De 10h30 à 12h00


Online Streaming and its Effects on Society

By Hannes DATTA
Joint work with George Knox and Bart Bronnenberg (both Tilburg University)

Digital streaming is set to take over as the dominant business model in industries like music (e.g., Spotify), movies (e.g., Netflix), books (e.g., Kindle Unlimited), and games (e.g., Steam). Instead of purchasing individual content, streaming allows users to rent access to a vast library of digital content that is free at the margin. Using a panel data set of individual consumers’ listening histories across many platforms, we study how the shift from purchasing to streaming affects society.

Prior work has established that the adoption of online streaming leads to a sizeable effects at the individual level. For example, consumers discover more new content, and tend to favor less popular artists over superstars. However, it is not clear how online streaming affects consumption behavior at the societal level (i.e., across consumers). On the one hand, consumer tastes may become fragmented when choosing among less popular and newer artists. On the other hand, consumer tastes may become more homogenous if recommendation systems and curated playlists on streaming services push users to the same new content.

From a public policy perspective, too much fragmentation is bad news because it can diminish social capital, as fewer people share the same experience. However, too little fragmentation may signal a lack of diversity, favoring superstars and damaging independent labels. We examine several possible drivers of fragmentation, and use our data to test competing explanations.

Valuing Non-Contractual Firms Using Common Customer Metrics

Marketing

Intervenant : Daniel McCarthy
Doctorant Départment de Statistiques , Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania

3 mars 2017 - Salle T04 - De 10h30 à 12h00


Valuing Non-Contractual Firms Using Common Customer Metrics

There is growing interest in the notion of “customer-based corporate valuation,” explicitly tying the value of a firm's customers to the firm's overall financial valuation. While much progress has been made in building a well-validated customer-based valuation model for contractual (or subscription-based) firms, there has been less progress for non-contractual firms (e.g., retail, travel/hospitality, and mobile gaming). Non-contractual businesses have more complex transactional patterns than contractual ones for a variety of reasons, including (1) they are characterized by latent attrition instead of observable churn behavior, (2) they often have irregular purchase incidence timing and spend amounts. These factors make it harder to reconstruct granular purchase behaviors from aggregate data, and to understand what metrics would serve as the best inputs for such a model. Despite this lack of guidance, a number of non-contractual firms regularly report a variety of different aggregate measures to their shareholders (e.g., the number of active users). We use a novel methodology based upon “indirect inference,” a well-established generalization of generalized method-of-moments procedures, to draw a connection between these common aggregate metrics and the underlying parameters of latent variable models for repeat purchasing. We show how the overall predictive validity of the models varies as a function of the combination of metrics used to train the models; this allows us to better understand both how many and which metrics are needed to achieve adequate predictions of future revenues. We apply this methodology to quarterly data from the largest subsidiary of an e-commerce retailer, valuing the subsidiary as a whole, decomposing this valuation into existing and yet-to-be-acquired customers, and analyzing the profitability of newly-acquired customers.

To Look Like a King or Feel Like a King? Power and the Desire for Experiential vs. Material Luxury

Marketing

Intervenant : David DUBOIS
Professeur Assistant de Marketing , INSEAD

26 janvier 2017 - Salle T030 - De 10h30 à 12h00


To Look Like a King or Feel Like a King? Power and the Desire for Experiential vs. Material Luxury

By David DUBOIS

This work proposes that power shifts consumers’ desire for different types of luxury options (i.e., experiential vs. material luxury) due to a change in sensitivity to the kind of benefit consumers expect a luxury option to deliver (i.e., the experience or appearance of status). Specifically, building on findings that high power activates a propensity for agency and performance, we posit that high power increases consumers’ sensitivity to status experience. In contrast, because low power activates a propensity for communion and visibility, we posit that low power increases consumers’ sensitivity to status appearance. As a result, we hypothesize that high power triggers a desire for experiential luxury (but not material luxury), and that low power triggers a desire for material luxury (but not experiential luxury). Six studies provide converging evidence for the effect across online, lab and field settings using multiple power manipulations and measures. They also show that the effect is muted when consumption options are nonluxury, and unexplained by differences in feelings of financial deprivation, expected feelings of uniqueness, or options’ perceived riskiness or longevity. Finally, a causal chain design and a mediation provide evidence for the underlying shift in sensitivity to status experience vs. appearance.


Affective Boundaries of Scope Insensitivity

Marketing

Intervenant : Hannah H. Chang
Professeur Assistant de Marketing , Singapore Management University

25 octobre 2016 - SalleT015 - De 10h30 à 12h00


Affective Boundaries of Scope Insensitivity

Hannah H. CHANG
Singapore Management University

Abstract: When making valuation judgments, people can be surprisingly insensitive to the quantity of the objects in question—a phenomenon called scope insensitivity that is generally attributed to the operation of affective processes in judgment. Building on recent research showing that affect is inherently a decision-making system of the present, we propose that scope insensitivity is more likely to be observed in decisions that are psychologically proximate to the immediate self. Consistent with this proposition, results from seven experiments show that scope insensitivity is more likely in decisions that are temporally proximate, both prospectively (near future vs. distant future) and retrospectively (recent past vs. distant past), and in decisions that are psychologically proximate in terms of social or physical distance. These findings clarify the boundaries of the scope-insensitivity phenomenon and refine our understanding of the affective system of judgment. The findings suggest that, rather than just a decision-making system of the present, the affective system is more broadly a decision-making system of the immediate self. Any form of distance from the immediate self (in time, social relation, or physical space) tends to attenuate the engagement of the affective system.

Passing the Buck to the Wealthier

Marketing

Intervenant : Jonathan Berman
Professeur Assistant du Marketing , London Business School

5 octobre 2016 - Salle T025 - De 13h30 à 15h00


Passing the Buck to the Wealthier

How much do consumers believe that they and others should donate to charity? We find that judgments of donation obligations are referent-dependent, and are determined by people’s own earnings. This reference-dependence holds across income levels and is driven in part by overestimating the relationship between income and spare money. Individuals expect that richer others have more spare money—and thereby should donate more to charity—than what those richer others evaluate for themselves. As a result, consumers pass donation obligations onto wealthier others, who in turn pass obligations on to even wealthier others.

Playing to Learn and Learning to Play: Effects of SuperstarApp Adoption on Enhancements to Mobile App Proficiency

Marketing

Intervenant : Sungho Park
Professeur Assistant Marketing , Arizona State University

6 juin 2016 - Bâtiment T, Salle T030 - De 13h30 à 15h00


Despite the massive influx of mobile apps into the market, mobile users substantially differ with respect to their mobile app proficiency, i.e., the advent of mobile digital inequality. Using a dataset on individual mobile app usage, we examine the potential of highly ranked “superstar apps” as stimulants of consumption in terms of volume and extent, especially among less mobile-proficient users. We employ the Gaussian copula-based difference-in-differences framework given that it allows us to construct a flexible joint model of continuous app usage duration and discrete number of apps used. Results indicate that superstar adoption boosts app use variety and volume within the same app category and across different categories. Such spillover effects are more pronounced among less technically knowledgeable groups (e.g., users in their 50s or older and late adopters) and managerially under-represented target segments (e.g., irregular, occasional, and light app users). Use frequency and duration among superstar app adopters increase for newly downloaded apps but decrease for existing apps. We provide valuable implications that marketers can capitalize on to target low-proficiency users. We also recommend that policy makers can use superstar apps as nonintrusive and cost-efficient vehicles for enhancing mobile app proficiency and bridging the mobile digital inequality.

A Model for Inferring Market Preferences from Online Retail Product Information Matrices

Marketing

Intervenant : Siddarth Sivaramakrishnan
Professeur Associé , University of Southern California

1 juin 2016 - Bâtiment T, Salle T025 - De 10h30 à 12h00


This research extends information display board methods, currently employed to study information processing patterns in laboratory settings, to a field based setting that also yields managerially useful estimates of market preferences. A new model is proposed based on statistical, behavioral, and economic theories, which integrates three decisions consumers must make in this context: which product-attribute to inspect next, when to stop processing, and which, if any, product to purchase. Several theoretical options are considered on how to model product attribute selection and how to treat uninspected attributes. The modeling options are empirically tested employing datasets collected at a popular retail-manufacturer’s website, while customers were making product evaluation and purchase decisions. Subsequent to identifying the best model, we show how the resulting attribute preference estimates can be managerially employed to improve customer targeting of abandoned shopping carts, for follow up communications aimed at improving sales conversions.


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